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Abstract: Evidence suggests that Aborignal youth are at higher risk for sexual health problems, including HIV and sexually transmitted infections (STI), than are non-Aboriginal youth. Given that condom use is effective in preventing HIV/STI and that self-efficacy is predictive of condom use, it is noteworthy that there is so little research on self-efficacy to use condoms in Aboriginal youth. This study employed a community action research strategy to examine the relationship between a set of cognitive and demographic variables and self-efficacy to use condoms in a sample of vulnerable and marginalized Aboriginal youth (N = 68). We found that those individuals who reported having sex at a later age and who scored higher on a measure of assertive communication reported higher levels of self-efficacy to use condoms. Suggestions concerning how these results could be incorporated in education programs are discussed. Introduction

GENRE
Body, Mind & Spirit
RELEASED
2007
22 March
LANGUAGE
EN
English
LENGTH
29
Pages
PUBLISHER
SIECCAN, The Sex Information and Education Council of Canada
SELLER
The Gale Group, Inc., a Delaware corporation and an affiliate of Cengage Learning, Inc.
SIZE
271.9
KB

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