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Publisher Description

One of the most important, and controversial, Confederate generals during the Civil War was Lieutenant General James Longstreet, Robert E. Lee’s “old warhorse.” Longstreet was Lee’s principal subordinate for most of the war, ably managing a corps in the Army of Northern Virginia. Longstreet was instrumental in Confederate victories at Second Bull Run, Fredericksburg, and Chickamauga, while he was also effective at Antietam and the Battle of the Wilderness, where he was nearly killed by a shot through the neck. 

Had Longstreet died on the field, he may have been one of the South’s biggest heroes. However, it was his performance at Gettysburg and arguments with other Southern generals after the Civil War that tarnished his image. Longstreet was charged with being slow to attack on the second day of the Battle of Gettysburg, allowing the Union to man Little Round Top. He also resisted Lee’s order for Pickett’s Charge the next day. The fact that he served in Republican administrations after the Civil War rubbed his former comrades the wrong way, and the Georgian’s criticism of Lee infuriated the Lost Cause advocates who idolized the Virginian Lee.

Although Longstreet would dive headfirst into the controversies in his memoirs, his account of the Battle of Gettysburg and the Pennsylvania Campaign in July 1863 makes little mention of his personal views. This account, part of the The War of The Rebellion: Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, mentions his doubts about Pickett’s Charge in a more understated manner. 

This edition is specially formatted with pictures of Longstreet

GENRE
History
RELEASED
2011
22 October
LANGUAGE
EN
English
LENGTH
18
Pages
PUBLISHER
Charles River Editors
SELLER
Charles River Editors
SIZE
429.9
KB

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