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Publisher Description

David Hollinger's discussion of how we have written American Jewish history and how we might better write it with a mind to integrating it into the larger narrative of the American experience is thoughtful and refreshingly candid. There have been considerable changes in how we write about the Jewish past over the decades, but even more may be required of a new generation of historians as they begin to make their contribution to the corpus of Jewish historical writing. It is a propitious moment to consider where we have been and where we should be headed. The dispersionist/communalist dichotomy is a useful one, although perhaps a bit dated. If these were ever truly competing postures, they are much less so today. There is room at the table for all. However, it is worth the risk of repetition to remind ourselves and to instruct our graduate students and younger colleagues about the obstacles in the academy that only a few decades ago confronted those inclined to explore Jewish history. Hollinger alludes to these barriers, but let me be more specific. I know this is an uncomfortable subject to revisit, unpleasant for many Jews to recall and appropriately embarrassing for many of our non-Jewish colleagues.

GENRE
Non-Fiction
RELEASED
2009
March 1
LANGUAGE
EN
English
LENGTH
15
Pages
PUBLISHER
American Jewish Historical Society
SELLER
The Gale Group, Inc., a Delaware corporation and an affiliate of Cengage Learning, Inc.
SIZE
188.2
KB

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