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Publisher Description

“Gone Fishing with the Natives” 


An autobiographical Travel Adventure set on an improbable course from Cape Breton Canada to the exotic South Pacific islands of Vanuatu. 


A multidimensional narrative combining storytelling, photography, video and audio that transports you virtually into the author’s world of foreign landscapes both natural and cultural. 


Peter Watt, a fisherman, aid worker, and adventurer living and working in two strikingly different communities, is our guide on this fascinating journey.


Set in the 1970’s and ‘80s, a time of counterculture, social change, and experimentation; Gone Fishing with the Natives is a must read for NGOs, travellers, and all those with a spirit of adventure and concern for the sustainability of our oceans.

GENRE
Biographies & Memoirs
RELEASED
2014
January 1
LANGUAGE
EN
English
LENGTH
541
Pages
PUBLISHER
Megawatt
SELLER
Watt McCaIN + ASSOCIATES
SIZE
294.2
MB

Customer Reviews

Fanflippintastic ,

Best ever travel adventure - Spiritually uplifting!

Peter Watt’s “Gone Fishing with the Natives” will change your life. Once you’ve read it, you will think differently about your life, and everybody else’s. You will also think differently about our civilization and the natural world which we take too much for granted and which we are rapidly destroying. But Gone Fishing with the Natives is not a tract; it’s a story – and an adventure. It’s a radical book about a radical choice; the choice of how to live, the courage to choose different kind of life. It is a book about the biggest of subjects: life. It’s full of adventure, joy, humor, and suspense. It’s also a book about failure – the failure of well-meaning efforts to improve the world, about the fragility of the world we live in, notably the fragility of the oceans and their wildlife or fish stocks, but also about the fragility of less technologically advanced societies when do-gooders from what used to be called the “First World” step in and try to change and improve them. Each change, say introducing a new fishing boat, or a refrigerator, into a village, can set off an unpredictable chain reaction of unintended consequences. Watt’s book captures the vast mysterious and dangerous beauty of the world we live in. Finally, essentially, it explores that most vital - but neglected - of topics: how to live ‘the good life’. The form of the book, an elegant easy to use e-book, with extraordinary videos and photographs embedded in it, also provides a unique, and very pleasurable and enlightening experience. Just hearing the synthetic language invented by the natives of the scattered islands is hugely enriching. Peter Watt has carried out the experiment many of us dreamed of. Remember when you were young with the big choices of life just opening up. You may have thought you could be and do anything; you could, even, be anybody. You might reject the conventions of society and race off to live a true and authentic life, elemental, rooted, in touch with nature, and with simple feelings, far from the temptations and compromises of consumerism, of mortgages, and clichés, far from the equivalent of the white picket fence?

Well, Peter Watt did it – he seized the freedom to be…

Peter Watt is a brave and stubborn and unassuming man who did make the choice – the hard and adventurous choice to face the ‘authentic life’. Leaving a privileged life in Toronto, he headed off and become a lobster fisherman on Canada’s Atlantic Coast. Lobster fishing is extremely complex, difficult, and requires a vast range of skills and knowledge; here is a first lesson. We city dwellers are the simpletons. Most of us work with concepts, words, and numbers; we live in a world of abstractions; in effect, we push paper; so we are over-specialized, poor in our skill set and knowledge, compared to the average lobster fisherman.

So Peter Watt didn’t “opt out”; on the contrary; he opted in: he took a real plunge into real life where specific and extraordinarily complex skills, and forms of knowledge, plus sweat and muscle power and risking one's skin are required. Lobster fishing, for example, is something I had never really thought about; now I can almost feel the ropes, the weather, and also the complex and ever-changing challenges involved in placing the traps, protecting them, adapting to changing currents, bottom conditions, weather, protecting the boat, transporting the catch, etc. It's this hands-on, down-and-dirty aspect which is life-changing. You realize how complex this totally different - and for we city dwelling paper-pushers alien - world is, what incredible intelligence and force of character and perseverance is needed to do the job of a lobster fisherman. Suddenly a whole different mode of existence, and way of relating the physicality of the world is revealed. Heidegger, I think, would have approved. And it is a way of existence which, as Peter demonstrates, is disappearing, or has already disappeared, with the arrival of high-tech industrialized fishing, sweeping all before it. Peter leaps from the cold of the Atlantic to the tropics of the Pacific when he sets off to help a village develop its own local fishing industry, by bringing the villagers a new boat, and new technologies. Then, in the Pacific, just the laying of a Fish Aggregating Device - I didn't even know such a thing existed - in the right position, that is an epic worthy of Homer, plus dealing with the local lore about witches and witchcraft and the laying down of spells, learning the local synthetic language – a sort of minimal version of English – and the difficulty of introducing a monetary economy and accounting logic into a society where everybody borrows everything and where friends and relatives and villagers have a fluid and seemingly capricious claim to all individual property and earnings, where society is comprised of an invisible but powerful net of implicit obligations, promises, and expectations, how that is recounted and explained - with lots of humor and humanity - is worth more than a ton of volumes on economic development. Also, Peter has to figure out who has leadership qualities and who doesn’t, and who can be trusted and who can’t be trusted, and all of this in an almost totally alien society. Then, when his daughter comes to visit - the dilemmas of having a child who descends as it were from another planet, is a story superbly told. We live through hurricanes and shipwrecks, and we experience rituals and friendships that come from another world, a fast disappearing world that none of us now will ever be privileged to see. Gone Fishing with the Natives is a great spiritual and physical adventure. It is well worth the trip.
By Gilbert Reid

Gil Reid ,

Spiritual and Physical Adventure at its very best.

Peter Watt’s “Gone Fishing with the Natives” will change your life. Once you’ve read it, you will think differently about your life, and everybody else’s. You will also think differently about our civilization and the natural world which we take too much for granted and which we are rapidly destroying. But Gone Fishing with the Natives is not a tract; it’s a story – and an adventure. It’s a radical book about a radical choice; the choice of how to live, the courage to choose different kind of life. It is a book about the biggest of subjects: life. It’s full of adventure, joy, humor, and suspense. It’s also a book about failure – the failure of well-meaning efforts to improve the world, about the fragility of the world we live in, notably the fragility of the oceans and their wildlife or fish stocks, but also about the fragility of less technologically advanced societies when do-gooders from what used to be called the “First World” step in and try to change and improve them. Each change, say introducing a new fishing boat, or a refrigerator, into a village, can set off an unpredictable chain reaction of unintended consequences. Watt’s book captures the vast mysterious and dangerous beauty of the world we live in. Finally, essentially, it explores that most vital - but neglected - of topics: how to live ‘the good life’.
The form of the book, an elegant easy to use e-book, with extraordinary videos and photographs embedded in it, also provides a unique, and very pleasurable and enlightening experience. Just hearing the synthetic language invented by the natives of the scattered islands is hugely enriching.
Peter Watt has carried out the experiment many of us dreamed of. Remember when you were young with the big choices of life just opening up. You may have thought you could be and do anything; you could, even, be anybody. You might reject the conventions of society and race off to live a true and authentic life, elemental, rooted, in touch with nature, and with simple feelings, far from the temptations and compromises of consumerism, of mortgages, and clichés, far from the equivalent of the white picket fence?
Well, Peter Watt did it – he seized the freedom to be…
Peter Watt is a brave and stubborn and unassuming man who did make the choice – the hard and adventurous choice to face the ‘authentic life’. Leaving a privileged life in Toronto, he headed off and become a lobster fisherman on Canada’s Atlantic Coast. Lobster fishing is extremely complex, difficult, and requires a vast range of skills and knowledge; here is a first lesson. We city dwellers are the simpletons. Most of us work with concepts, words, and numbers; we live in a world of abstractions; in effect, we push paper; so we are over-specialized, poor in our skill set and knowledge, compared to the average lobster fisherman.
So Peter Watt didn’t “opt out”; on the contrary; he opted in: he took a real plunge into real life where specific and extraordinarily complex skills, and forms of knowledge, plus sweat and muscle power and risking one's skin are required. Lobster fishing, for example, is something I had never really thought about; now I can almost feel the ropes, the weather, and also the complex and ever-changing challenges involved in placing the traps, protecting them, adapting to changing currents, bottom conditions, weather, protecting the boat, transporting the catch, etc. It's this hands-on, down-and-dirty aspect which is life-changing. You realize how complex this totally different - and for we city dwelling paper-pushers alien - world is, what incredible intelligence and force of character and perseverance is needed to do the job of a lobster fisherman. Suddenly a whole different mode of existence, and way of relating the physicality of the world is revealed. Heidegger, I think, would have approved. And it is a way of existence which, as Peter demonstrates, is disappearing, or has already disappeared, with the arrival of high-tech industrialized fishing, sweeping all before it. Peter leaps from the cold of the Atlantic to the tropics of the Pacific when he sets off to help a village develop its own local fishing industry, by bringing the villagers a new boat, and new technologies. Then, in the Pacific, just the laying of a Fish Aggregating Device - I didn't even know such a thing existed - in the right position, that is an epic worthy of Homer, plus dealing with the local lore about witches and witchcraft and the laying down of spells, learning the local synthetic language – a sort of minimal version of English – and the difficulty of introducing a monetary economy and accounting logic into a society where everybody borrows everything and where friends and relatives and villagers have a fluid and seemingly capricious claim to all individual property and earnings, where society is comprised of an invisible but powerful net of implicit obligations, promises, and expectations, how that is recounted and explained - with lots of humor and humanity - is worth more than a ton of volumes on economic development. Also, Peter has to figure out who has leadership qualities and who doesn’t, and who can be trusted and who can’t be trusted, and all of this in an almost totally alien society. Then, when his daughter comes to visit - the dilemmas of having a child who descends as it were from another planet, is a story superbly told. We live through hurricanes and shipwrecks, and we experience rituals and friendships that come from another world, a fast disappearing world that none of us now will ever be privileged to see. Gone Fishing with the Natives is a great spiritual and physical adventure. It is well worth the trip.

Fuzegus ,

A true literary adventure

An incredible experience like no other in traditional literary forms. This book starts with a great story but adds to the experience with sounds and video that work brilliantly to enhance the tale. You may not have lived this story but after reading this book you'll feel like you did.

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