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1. INTRODUCTION The role of physical education in general education is acknowledged in scholarship. According to Charles Butcher (1975:77), physical education programs can contribute to academic performance by providing daily movement experience and instruction in selected motor activities, promoting physical fitness and good health practices toward the development of the individual. The performing artist is no exception. Movement is imbued in theatre. Various theatre events and musical performances are characterized by stylization and symbolism of movement (Wilson, 2001:109). In Nigeria, like other African countries, there are some indigenous theatres like the Yoruba Alarinjo theatre, which often calls for special skills in mine, juggling, somersaulting and acrobatics. To accomplish these stylized and symbolic physical movements, the performer needs be a physical fit. Perhaps, this is among the reasons why many theatre scholars like Edwin Wilson (2001:91-113) and Robert Cohen (2000:63-68) have advocated for the vigorous training of actors' physiological and psychological instruments during the years of formal training, and during their career as professionals. For example, Wilson recommends warm-up exercises for body movement and vocal rehabilitation. He insists that, in the modern training of performers, art teachers should borrow training techniques and instructions from other disciplines.

GENRE
Non-Fiction
RELEASED
2010
June 30
LANGUAGE
EN
English
LENGTH
18
Pages
PUBLISHER
Canadian Academy of Oriental and Occidental Culture
SELLER
The Gale Group, Inc., a Delaware corporation and an affiliate of Cengage Learning, Inc.
SIZE
106.6
KB