No Kitchen Cabinet This: Frances Perkins Becomes Secretary of Labor (Teaching WITH ONLINE PRIMARY SOURCES: DOCUMENTS FROM THE NATIONAL ARCHIVES) No Kitchen Cabinet This: Frances Perkins Becomes Secretary of Labor (Teaching WITH ONLINE PRIMARY SOURCES: DOCUMENTS FROM THE NATIONAL ARCHIVES)

No Kitchen Cabinet This: Frances Perkins Becomes Secretary of Labor (Teaching WITH ONLINE PRIMARY SOURCES: DOCUMENTS FROM THE NATIONAL ARCHIVES‪)‬

Teaching History: A Journal of Methods, 2008, Fall, 33, 2

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Publisher Description

Franklin D. Roosevelt took the oath of office as the thirty-second President of the United States on Saturday, March 4, 1933. The same day he called the U.S. Senate into a special session to consider his ten nominees for his cabinet. In just 24 minutes, the Senate confirmed all ten. Among them was Frances Perkins as Secretary of Labor. (1) At the date of the featured document, the United States was in the depths of the Great Depression. It was the worst and longest economic collapse in the history of the modern industrial world, lasting from the end of 1929 until the early 1940s. The Great Depression was characterized by severe and rapid declines in the production and sale of goods and a sudden and severe rise in unemployment. Businesses and banks closed their doors, people lost their jobs, homes, and savings, and many depended on charity to survive. In 1933, fifteen million Americans--one-quarter of the nation's work force--were unemployed. As a result, the Presidential election of 1932 was a clear and true contest to find a savior for America. In June 1932, Republican delegates convened in Chicago and nominated Herbert Hoover and Charles Curtis. Later that same month, the Democrats also assembled in Chicago and nominated Franklin Delano Roosevelt and John Nance Garner. To demonstrate the urgency of the situation, Roosevelt immediately delivered his acceptance speech in Chicago and pledged a New Deal for the American people. In an overwhelming election mandate, Roosevelt and Garner collected 472 electoral votes to Hoover and Curtis's 59. The popular vote was equally lopsided with Roosevelt garnering 22,821,857 votes to Hoover's 15,761,845.

GENRE
Professional & Technical
RELEASED
2008
September 22
LANGUAGE
EN
English
LENGTH
11
Pages
PUBLISHER
Emporia State University
SELLER
The Gale Group, Inc., a Delaware corporation and an affiliate of Cengage Learning, Inc.
SIZE
222.8
KB

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