The Toronto Star and the Winnipeg General Strike. The Toronto Star and the Winnipeg General Strike.

The Toronto Star and the Winnipeg General Strike‪.‬

Manitoba History 2005, June, 49

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Publisher Description

To the average Canadian outside of Winnipeg in the summer of 1919, it must have seemed as if that city was at war. On May 13 the Winnipeg Trades and Labour Council (WTLC) tallied the vote of its nearly 100 affiliated unions on whether to call city-wide action in sympathy with striking construction and metal workers. The result was 11,000 in favour and 500 opposed. Two days later a general strike of over 25,000 union and non-union workers began--paralyzing Winnipeg's industry, transport, fire, police, postal service and communications. The city's three daily papers, with a combined circulation of approximately 14,500, were forced to close on May 16 when union staff Shut down the presses. Like a prairie wildfire, labour difficulties seemed to spread across the nation from the capital of Manitoba. The bitter and protracted dispute in Winnipeg, ending in arrests, demonstrations, violence, injuries and death, was to last 41 days, making it the longest general strike in Canadian history. In over 130 Canadian cities served by daily newspapers, apprehension and fear became the dominant feelings of hundreds of thousands of readers, as the dispute in the prairie center seemed unsolvable and unstoppable. In gripping headlines, flaming editorials and cartoons, almost every major newspaper, including powerful American dailies, dramatically reported and editorialized Winnipeg's strike as a Bolshevik-One Big Union (1) conspiracy to topple constituted authority. In Toronto, five of the six dailies accepted and exploited this theory. Shock followed by condemnation and a defiant call for strong action against the strikers was their collective response.

GENRE
History
RELEASED
2005
June 1
LANGUAGE
EN
English
LENGTH
36
Pages
PUBLISHER
Manitoba Historical Society
SELLER
The Gale Group, Inc., a Delaware corporation and an affiliate of Cengage Learning, Inc.
SIZE
206.7
KB

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