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Publisher Description

A tribute to the Duke of Wellington, written after his death in 1852 by one of his former aides and a popular author of amusing autobiographical works. In it, the author provides an account of life in Paris with the British army of occupation following Waterloo. In 1813, Lennox had been gazetted a cornet in the Royal Horse Guards (Blues) through Wellington’s patronage and, on 8 August 1814, he “accompanied Wellington as an unpaid attaché to his embassy in Paris, and was there during the peace negotiations. In 1815 he was attached to General Sir Peregrine Maitland’s staff, and was present at his mother’s famous eve of Waterloo ball in Brussels. An accident when riding a Cossack horse in a race on 15 April 1815 precluded him from taking an active part in the battle of Waterloo, but he was able later to give a lively description of the scene, which he observed” (Oxford DNB).
In this homage, he praises Wellington’s military brilliance as one “who never advanced but to cover his arms with glory, and who never retreated but to eclipse the very glory of his advance.”
Author — Lennox, William Pitt, Lord, 1799-1881.
Text taken, whole and complete, from the edition published in London, Saunders, 1853.
Original Page Count – 272 p.

GENRE
History
RELEASED
2013
March 2
LANGUAGE
EN
English
LENGTH
137
Pages
PUBLISHER
Wagram Press
SELLER
INscribe Digital
SIZE
616
KB

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