Select Men of Sober and Industrious Habits: Alcohol Reform and Social Conflict in Antebellum Appalachia. Select Men of Sober and Industrious Habits: Alcohol Reform and Social Conflict in Antebellum Appalachia.

Select Men of Sober and Industrious Habits: Alcohol Reform and Social Conflict in Antebellum Appalachia‪.‬

Journal of Southern History 2007, May, 73, 2

    • 2,99 €
    • 2,99 €

Beschreibung des Verlags

NO OTHER INSTITUTIONS IN OUR OPINION, CAN HAVE A MORE SALUTARY influence in checking vice, and giving a right direction to our various passions and appetites, than Temperance Societies." So wrote physician Jason F. E. Hardy, explaining why he and other middle-class reformers had founded the Asheville Auxiliary Temperance Society in Buncombe County in April 1831. (1) One of the first of its kind in western North Carolina, this organization was initially a success. Forty mountain residents, mostly from Asheville, joined the society that April because they believed that alcohol was impeding the community's moral and economic prosperity. Two months later the number of members had increased to sixty-five. But support for the Asheville Auxiliary Temperance Society was far from universal, especially in more remote parts of the county. Many farmers argued that the society and its desire to eradicate King Alcohol--as temperance advocates often termed alcoholic beverages--were "a scheme to deprive the people of their liberty." Several mountain churches joined the chorus of opposition, threatening to expel congregants who joined the organization. By 1832 the Asheville Auxiliary Temperance Society faced an uncertain future, as "enem[ies]" reduced its membership "to a bare majority." (2) To the dismay of Hardy and other Asheville reformers, King Alcohol proved to be a formidable adversary. Since the 1980s historians have debunked the notion that southerners were not receptive to alcohol reform during the antebellum period. (3) Ian R. Tyrrell, John W. Quist, and other scholars have argued persuasively that the temperance movement in the South differed little from that elsewhere in the United States. Like their cohorts in the North, most southern reformers were middle-class professionals who tended to reside in towns with a thousand or more inhabitants. There members of the urban middle class were numerous enough to influence local politics, and they embraced the temperance movement, believing that it would improve their communities both morally and economically. These towns, mostly situated in the lowland South, also tended to have large African American populations, whose presence further encouraged whites to promote alcohol reform as an instrument of social control. (4)

GENRE
Geschichte
ERSCHIENEN
2007
1. Mai
SPRACHE
EN
Englisch
UMFANG
64
Seiten
VERLAG
Southern Historical Association
GRÖSSE
283,9
 kB

Mehr ähnliche Bücher

The Social Order of a Frontier Community The Social Order of a Frontier Community
2023
Grassroots Reform in the Burned-over District of Upstate New York Grassroots Reform in the Burned-over District of Upstate New York
2014
Southern Society and Its Transformations, 1790-1860 Southern Society and Its Transformations, 1790-1860
2011
America Walks into a Bar America Walks into a Bar
2011
Pennsylvania Histories Pennsylvania Histories
2015
Sugar Creek Sugar Creek
2017

Mehr Bücher von Journal of Southern History

Thomas Jefferson, Coercion, And the Limits of Harmonious Union (Report) Thomas Jefferson, Coercion, And the Limits of Harmonious Union (Report)
2008
Masters of the Big House: Elite Slaveholders of the Mid-Nineteenth-Century South (Book Review) Masters of the Big House: Elite Slaveholders of the Mid-Nineteenth-Century South (Book Review)
2005
American Mediterranean: Southern Slaveholders in the Age of Emancipation (A Confluence of Transatlantic Networks: Elites, Capitalism, And Confederate Migration to Brazil) (The Problem of Emancipation: The Caribbean Roots of the American Civil War) (Book Review) American Mediterranean: Southern Slaveholders in the Age of Emancipation (A Confluence of Transatlantic Networks: Elites, Capitalism, And Confederate Migration to Brazil) (The Problem of Emancipation: The Caribbean Roots of the American Civil War) (Book Review)
2011
Indebtedness and the Origins of Guerrilla Violence in Civil War Missouri (Essay) Indebtedness and the Origins of Guerrilla Violence in Civil War Missouri (Essay)
2009
Democracy and Its Consequences in Antebellum America: A Review Essay (Social Change in America: From the Revolution Through the Civil War, The Rise of American Democracy: Jefferson to Lincoln) (Book Review) Democracy and Its Consequences in Antebellum America: A Review Essay (Social Change in America: From the Revolution Through the Civil War, The Rise of American Democracy: Jefferson to Lincoln) (Book Review)
2008
Politics and the Misadventures of Thomas Jefferson's Modern Reputation: A Review Essay (Portrait of a Restless Mind) (Thomas Jefferson) (Jefferson's Secrets: Death and Desire at Monticello) (Adams Vs. Jefferson: The Tumultuous Election of 1800) ("Negro President": Jefferson and the Slave Power) (Book Review) Politics and the Misadventures of Thomas Jefferson's Modern Reputation: A Review Essay (Portrait of a Restless Mind) (Thomas Jefferson) (Jefferson's Secrets: Death and Desire at Monticello) (Adams Vs. Jefferson: The Tumultuous Election of 1800) ("Negro President": Jefferson and the Slave Power) (Book Review)
2006