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HOW TO IMPROVE DRESSINGS AND GRAVIES WITH LEA & PERRINS' SAUCE

After all, there are only a certain number of meats and fishes—and a tiresomely small number, too, we often think. But the thing that makes them seem more varied—the different feature of each is the dressing or gravy that is served with them—the dressing which is made through the inimitable flavor of Lea & Perrins' Sauce, a distinguishing addition to the dish.

The zest, the piquancy, the keen edge which Lea & Perrins' Sauce gives to a dressing or gravy has long been known and used to advantage by the high-salaried chefs of our luxurious restaurants and hotels. And now that the chef's secret is known, every homemaker has at her fingers' ends the basic knowledge for creating from one or two recipes an infinite variety of rich, delicious dressings that will transform the plainest food and make the simplest home meal an appetizing repast.

Foods that are too dry can be bettered with a thin dressing—enhanced by the addition of Lea & Perrins' Sauce; for more moist foods a thicker gravy, also seasoned with Lea & Perrins' Sauce, should be added. Plain dishes may be embellished, rich dishes "toned down" with contrasting flavors.

But whether the dressing be thick or thin, mild or rich, the addition of Lea & Perrins' Sauce improves beyond your expectation the recipe wherein it is used. Its flavor cannot be imitated, and it has never been equalled. It is the original Worcestershire—and the only all-perfect seasoning.

Lea & Perrins are the sole manufacturers of the Original Worcestershire Sauce. Be sure to add Lea & Perrins' Sauce to all recipes.

DIFFERENT KINDS OF DRESSINGS

There are two big classes of dressings, brown and white. The brown dressings are usually made with meat juices or extracts known as "stock," or by first browning the flour which is used to thicken them. The white or cream dressings are made with white stock, the water in which vegetables, onion, celery, rice, chicken or mutton have been cooked, milk or cream as the liquid ingredient, and thickened with white flour. The brown dressings are more frequently served with meats, poultry and game, the white or cream dressings with fish and vegetables.

Dressings are also named by the main ingredient from which they gain their flavor, as Mushroom Dressing, Tomato Dressing, Mint Dressing, Cheese Dressing.

Other dressings are classified by the ingredient with which they are thickened, as Flour and Butter Dressings, Cornstarch Dressings, Egg Dressings and Drawn Butter Dressings.

HOW AND WHEN TO SEASON DRESSINGS WITH LEA & PERRINS' SAUCE

To procure the full zest, piquancy and flavor of Lea & Perrins' Sauce in seasoning any dressing or gravy, you must add the Lea & Perrins' Sauce just before removing the dressing from the fire. If the dressing must stand for any length of time, do not add Lea & Perrins' Sauce until just before serving time.

The proportion of Lea & Perrins' Sauce to add to meat dressings and gravies is, for an average taste, about two teaspoonfuls of Lea & Perrins' to every cupful of dressing. To delicate white stock dressings and vegetable sauces, in which the flavor of the vegetable should dominate, use one-half of a teaspoonful of Lea & Perrins' Sauce to every cupful of dressing.

When such vegetables as onion, bay leaf, carrots or other highly seasoned vegetables are used in a sauce, they should be cooked in the butter or fat with which the sauce is made before the liquid is added. But if the vegetable which is used in the dressing is to be retained in the sauce, it is frequently added after the dressing has been completed. This is the case when chopped olives, asparagus tips, mushrooms and other vegetables are used………………………….

GÉNERO
Cocina, gastronomía y vinos
PUBLICADO
2020
25 de marzo
IDIOMA
EN
Inglés
EXTENSIÓN
94
Páginas
EDITORIAL
Rectory Print
VENTAS
Babafemi Titilayo Olowe
TAMAÑO
5.4
MB

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