The Origin of the Nomina Sacra: A Proposal‪.‬

Journal of Biblical Literature 1998, Winter, 117, 4

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Descripción editorial

The nomina sacra are a collection of words (ultimately, fifteen became common) written in special abbreviated forms in Christian sources to indicate their sacred character (see fig. 1). (1) The words given this special treatment fall into three groups: (1) the four earliest attested and most consistently rendered words, [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII.]; (2) three additional terms, which appear to be slightly later and less uniformly treated: [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII.]; (2) and (3) the remaining eight, [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII.], which are abbreviated less consistently and appear to have joined the list of sacred terms latest. (3) Ludwig Traube's 1907 book is usually credited with having drawn the attention of scholarly circles to this subject, and it is he from whom the label "nomina sacra" derives. (4) Among more recent scholars, C. H. Roberts in particular has emphasized the importance of the nomina sacra as a distinguishing feature of early Christianity. (5) The major questions connected with the nomina sacra are (1) whether this scribal practice originated in pre-Christian circles or was a Christian innovation, and (2) what the practice represents and what religious impetus lies behind it. In this essay I wish to review the issues involved and offer a proposal as to how and why the phenomenon may have begun in Christian circles. I

GÉNERO
Técnicos y profesionales
PUBLICADO
1998
22 de diciembre
IDIOMA
EN
Inglés
EXTENSIÓN
41
Páginas
EDITORIAL
Society of Biblical Literature
TAMAÑO
214
KB

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