• 25,99 €

Description de l’éditeur

The translation of texts has played a formative role in Japan's history of cultural exchange as well as the development of literature, and indigenous legal and religious systems. This is the first book of its kind, however, to offer a comprehensive survey of the role of translation in Japan during the Tokugawa period, 1600–1868. By examining a wide range of texts that were translated into Japanese from Chinese merchants, Jesuit missionaries and Dutch traders, as well as the translation of classical Japanese into the vernacular, Rebekah Clements reveals the circles of intellectual and political exchange that took place in pre-modern Japan and that contrary to popular belief, Japan's 'translation' culture did not begin in Meiji. By examining the 'crisis translation' of military texts in response to international threats to security in the nineteenth century, the book also offers fresh insights into the overthrow of the Tokugawa Shogunate in 1868.

GENRE
Histoire
SORTIE
2015
4 avril
LANGUE
EN
Anglais
LONGUEUR
478
Pages
ÉDITEUR
Cambridge University Press
TAILLE
22
Mo