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Description de l’éditeur

Introduction Hallucinations are perceptions in the absence of an external stimulus (Bentall, 1990). The phenomena can occur in any sensory modality and can arise through neurologic disease, psychopathology, and the use of recreational drugs. Indeed hallucinations are widely accepted to be symptomatic of a psychotic disorder and like schizophrenia they occur within a clinical setting, however recently they have been investigated in healthy people who have a predisposition for visual hallucinations (Johns, 2005; Johns & Os van, 2001). Though not psychotic, these people can still have hallucinations as seen in clinical populations. Along these lines, studies evaluating the prevalence of hallucinations in the general public continually observe, on average, that 35%-40% of individuals admit that they have had some experience of visual hallucinatory phenomenon (Barrett & Etheridge, 1992; Ohayon, 2000; Posey & Losch, 1983; Tien, 1991). Higher degrees of negative affect, particularly depression, anxiety, and stress, have been repeatedly and consistently reported to correlate with hallucinations (Delespaul, Vries de, & Os van, 2002; Freeman & Garety, 2003). Observations like these suggest that emotional distress might have a direct influence on the onset of hallucinations or that some of the mechanisms that cause hallucinations may be managed or moderated by affective arousal (Slade & Bentall, 1988).

GENRE
Santé et bien-être
SORTIE
2011
1 juillet
LANGUE
EN
Anglais
LONGUEUR
14
Pages
ÉDITEUR
Scientific Research Publishing, Inc.
TAILLE
230.8
Ko

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