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Description de l’éditeur

Student safety, juxtaposed with outdoor education's dynamic aims and vision, creates a tension for primary school teachers. The tension plays out in teachers' pedagogy, language and practice. This paper examines how some New Zealand primary school teachers' claims about children's safety challenge opposing calls for adventurous and somewhat risky outdoor education experiences. Data is highlighted which demonstrates the work of competing discourses of safety and adventure. Teachers' talk is often produced in the context of "the safe child" and the risk anxiety debates of recent decades (Jones, 2004; Scott, Jackson,&Backett-Milburn, 1998; Wilkinson, 2001). How the tension is understood by teachers is investigated by focusing on teachers' discursive practices when talking about children's safety and outdoor education. The analytic approach employed, interpretative repertoires, provides insight by explicating teachers' systematic constructions of safety and enjoyment in outdoor education. As educators and parents we are curious about the ways that ubiquitous safety discourses are impacting on children's and teachers' outdoor engagement. This paper focuses on how teachers interpret the linked tasks of both keeping children safe and enabling children to experience the joys of participation in outdoor activities. Our discursive analytic approach emphasises the formation of teachers' safe practice within the broader context of risk society.

GENRE
Professionnel et technique
SORTIE
2011
1 janvier
LANGUE
EN
Anglais
LONGUEUR
29
Pages
ÉDITEUR
Outdoor Council of Australia
TAILLE
216.9
Ko

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