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Description de l’éditeur

Black women who surfer from a variety of mental health symptoms, which are persistent and at times debilitating, comprise a large target population for social workers. Although social work has a history of intervening with black women in mental health, there is a lack of theoretical and empirical knowledge concerning what is most effective with this population (Gutierrez, 1990; Hopps & Pinderhughes, 1999; Lewis & Ford, 1991; Padgett, Patrick, Burns, & Schlesinger, 1994). Most of the clinical studies concerning black women were based on a pathological perspective. These studies focused on maladaptive behaviors and negative mental health outcomes of black women and included academic problems, substance abuse, dysfunctional family cohesion and adaptation and coping responses to stress, domestic violence, and problems associated with single parenthood (Belle, 1990; Brown, 1990; Neighbors, Jackson, Bowman, & Gurin, 1983; Taylor, Chatters, Tucker, & Lewis, 1990). Few practice or research models have focused on the ability of black women to deal competently with their oppressive realities, which often lead to psychological and social dysfunction. Mental health researchers have identified the concepts of psychosocial competence (that is, locus of control, coping, and self-efficacy) and cultural diversity (that is, race, sex, and culture) as constructs central to improving models for understanding and enhancing the psychological well-being of black Americans in mental health treatment (Tyler, Brome, & Williams, 1991; Tyler & Pargament, 1981).

GENRE
Essais et sciences humaines
SORTIE
2004
1 janvier
LANGUE
EN
Anglais
LONGUEUR
23
Pages
ÉDITEUR
National Association of Social Workers
TAILLE
204.8
Ko

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