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Description de l’éditeur

Since the adoption of English braille in 1932 by the United States, braille has been developed quite often by design, but nearly as often by chance. Nowhere is that more evident than in the development of the Computer Braille Code (CBC) and the aftermath of its development. The very existence of CBC pays tribute to the flexibility with which Louis Braille designed his ingenious system of writing for people who are blind or visually impaired. The genesis of CBC came from the desire to translate and emboss printed texts into braille, using computers to increase both efficiency and the availability of braille materials. Two components were required to accomplish electronic braille translation. First, an embosser had to be created that could accept a symbol from a computer and convert that symbol into an embossable pattern of dots corresponding to a braille character. To use a simple example, the computer sends a symbol, such as the letter "a," to the embosser, which must convert that symbol into its corresponding braille character; in this case, "dot 1" of a typical six-dot braille cell.

GENRE
Santé et bien-être
SORTIE
2009
1 décembre
LANGUE
EN
Anglais
LONGUEUR
5
Pages
ÉDITEUR
American Foundation for the Blind
TAILLE
62.3
Ko

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