• 8,49 €

Description de l’éditeur

It's been nearly 25 years since Robert Kiyosaki’s Rich Dad Poor Dad first made waves in the Personal Finance arena.
It has since become the #1 Personal Finance book of all time... translated into dozens of languages and sold around the world.


Rich Dad Poor Dad is Robert's story of growing up with two dads — his real father and the father of his best friend, his rich dad — and the ways in which both men shaped his thoughts about money and investing. The book explodes the myth that you need to earn a high income to be rich and explains the difference between working for money and having your money work for you.


20 Years... 20/20 Hindsight

In the 20th Anniversary Edition of this classic, Robert offers an update on what we’ve seen over the past 20 years related to money, investing, and the global economy. Sidebars throughout the book will take readers “fast forward” — from 1997 to today — as Robert assesses how the principles taught by his rich dad have stood the test of time.

In many ways, the messages of Rich Dad Poor Dad, messages that were criticized and challenged two decades ago, are more meaningful, relevant and important today than they were 20 years ago.

As always, readers can expect that Robert will be candid, insightful... and continue to rock more than a few boats in his retrospective.

Will there be a few surprises? Count on it.



Rich Dad Poor Dad...


• Explodes the myth that you need to earn a high income to become rich
• Challenges the belief that your house is an asset
• Shows parents why they can't rely on the school system to teach their kids
about money
• Defines once and for all an asset and a liability
• Teaches you what to teach your kids about money for their future financial
success



Rich Dad Poor Dad is Robert's story of growing up with two dads — his real father and the father of his best friend, his rich dad — and the ways in which both men shaped his thoughts about money and investing. The book explodes the myth that you need to earn a high income to be rich and explains the difference between working for money and having your money work for you.



20 Years... 20/20 Hindsight


In the 20th Anniversary Edition of this classic, Robert offers an update on what we’ve seen over the past 20 years related to money, investing, and the global economy. Sidebars throughout the book will take readers “fast forward” — from 1997 to today — as Robert assesses how the principles taught by his rich dad have stood the test of time.

In many ways, the messages of Rich Dad Poor Dad, messages that were criticized and challenged two decades ago, are more meaningful, relevant and important today than they were 20 years ago.

As always, readers can expect that Robert will be candid, insightful... and continue to rock more than a few boats in his retrospective.

Will there be a few surprises? Count on it.





Rich Dad Poor Dad...



• Explodes the myth that you need to earn a high income to become rich
• Challenges the belief that your house is an asset
• Shows parents why they can't rely on the school system to teach their kids about money
• Defines once and for all an asset and a liability
• Teaches you what to teach your kids about money for their future financial success

GENRE
Entreprise et management
SORTIE
2017
11 avril
LANGUE
EN
Anglais
LONGUEUR
336
Pages
ÉDITEUR
Plata Publishing, LLC.
TAILLE
9.4
Mo

Avis d’utilisateurs

Supertrashindeed ,

Rich eye for the poor guy

I bought and read the book after having watch a very inspirational video by the author on Youtube. When I finished it, I realized that the book was less about what rich people teach their kids than what rich people believe about themselves. What it boils down to is that regular folks are suckers for playing by the rules. I for one think that any course of action that one takes in life is legitimate as long as it would work just as well if everyone else was doing it. However, even though the author looks down on salaried employment, he wouldn’t have gone anywhere without having employees. Many other advice looked extremely suspect to me: for example, one should be willing to work for free in exchange for knowledge. The reader is thus primed to be taken for a ride by anyone who will get real work in exchange of nothing tangible. The other major piece of advice is to 'pay yourself first,’ meaning that paying taxes, contractors and employees can be deferred until there’s enough money left after you paid yourself. If you manage to be so utterly selfish and self-serving, after a while people may just give up on trying to get what is theirs from you. You basically depend on suckers to thrive. That doesn’t sound like a sustainable business model to me!.
Reading Kiyosaki wikipedia page, I wasn’t surprised at all to discover that he admitted that the ‘rich dad’ is a figment of his imagination, so I guess this book should be listed in the ‘fiction’ category.
Kiyosaki is selling us a beautful rags-to-riches story, telling us just enough to want to learn more.(and sign up for his seminars and so on). I honestly believe there isn’t much more to learn than what is in the book. I would not advise people to look for any sound financial advice in it; rather, take it as the story ruthless rich people tell themselves to rationalize their less than ethical behavior.

Lucnimius ,

Rich Dad Poor Dad

This book should be mandatory to read!
You can like or dislike what the author tell in this book. Though in overall, it’s really interesting to be aware about the money (incomes, liabilities, expenses, assets). It’s a pity that the author made the promotion of his others books and games in the book.

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