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Description de l’éditeur

When Kritika published a special issue in 2001 on the state of the field ten years after the end of communism, it was logical to include a reassessment of the October Revolution and two pieces on the rapidly developing investigation of the Stalin period. (1) Transnational history went unmentioned, along with international and comparative approaches, for they did not yet appear crucial to the state of the field. If "culture" was "everywhere" in the Russian history of the 1990s, talk of the transnational became ubiquitous in the 2000s. (2) In retrospect, however, the first post-Soviet decade laid the groundwork for the proliferation of cross-border and cross-cultural approaches by furthering a closely related phenomenon: intensive investigation of comparative dimensions to Russian and Soviet history. (3) This essay argues that the interpretive implications of the transnational trend that crystallized in the second post-Soviet decade are most profound for the study of the revolutionary and communist period. This is for two reasons. First, the grand narratives of Soviet history have been focused internally from the field's outset, heightening the impact of cross-border research. Second, communism's intense ideological engagement with the outside world, combined with the effects of isolation from it, has the potential to generate a certain kind of transnational history centering on the interacting effects of models, contacts, and ideas--including rejections and misunderstandings. At the same time, from the perspective of 20 years after, transnational history in the Russian and Soviet field is still very much an unfinished scholarly revolution.

GENRE
Histoire
SORTIE
2011
22 septembre
LANGUE
EN
Anglais
LONGUEUR
36
Pages
ÉDITEUR
Slavica Publishers, Inc.
TAILLE
252.4
Ko

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