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Introduction The collection, use and disclosure of information in the context of assisted human reproduction warrant careful consideration. Consider the stories of Charles and Meera. (1) Charles is interested in donating sperm anonymously. Charles' sister and her partner used anonymous sperm to create their family, and he wants to help someone else do the same. But when he learns of the information requirements imposed by the Assisted Human Reproduction Act [AHRA], he hesitates. (2) Charles is worried about the extensive amount of information that his physician must collect from him and disclose to a government agency, the Assisted Human Reproduction Agency of Canada [Agency]. In particular, he is afraid that his infrequent recreational drug use will become known to the Agency. Charles is willing to disclose this information to the physician, to the recipient of his sperm and to the resulting child. However, he does not want to disclose this information to the Agency, for fear that it may negatively impact his job--or worse, lead to criminal prosecution--if it is inadvertently disclosed. Charles' physician has advised him that should he refuse to consent to the disclosure of his information to the Agency, he will not be allowed to donate sperm.

GENRE
Health & Well-Being
RELEASED
2009
January 1
LANGUAGE
EN
English
LENGTH
61
Pages
PUBLISHER
Health Law Institute
SIZE
302.7
KB

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