• £0.99

Publisher Description

'So brilliant . . . It couldn't really be more timely . . . I highly recommend it' DOLLY ALDERTON

'I loved it. The writing is whipsmart and so witty' MARIAN KEYES

Jane Peters is an adrift twenty-something by day, and a world-weary agony aunt by night. But when an office party goes too far, Jane dissolves into the high-stakes world of being the Other Woman: a role she has the right advice for, but not the smarts to follow through on.

What starts out as a drunken mistake quickly unravels as Jane discovers that sex and power go hand-in-hand, and that it's hard to keep your head when you've become someone else's dirty little secret. And soon, her friendships, her sanity and even her life are put into jeopardy...

'Sharp, pithy and engaging' IRISH TIMES

'Brilliant' ELLE

'Deeply relatable and darkly comic . . . It'll have you nodding with familiarity, thinking, laughing - and crying - as you race towards the end' GRAZIA

'A future classic' JANE CASEY

AN Post Irish Book Awards Shortlisted - Sunday Independent Newcomer of the Year

GENRE
Fiction & Literature
RELEASED
2018
June 7
LANGUAGE
EN
English
LENGTH
352
Pages
PUBLISHER
Little, Brown Book Group
SIZE
1.1
MB

Customer Reviews

Hwgirl ,

Painfully relevant, while also being very readable and funny

Any woman who has worked in an office/had an ill-judged romance/questioned their career and future will recognise elements of this book. Often very funny, but also painful in how accurately it represents the common every day sexism found in many workplaces. It absolutely captures the zeitgeist, while also being extremely readable - I finished it in a day, which is not usual for me!

Bbblhr ,

Not woman at work

The author notes at the end of the book say this is a book about women and work. No, it is not. Women work all the time without sleeping with their boss and drinking to excess. The story is interesting on it own but when I read the author’s notes I decided I hated the book because she tried to make it a statement piece. The character of Deb appears to be an afterthought added in an attempt to add a non-stupid, vapid female character.

More Books by Caroline O'Donoghue