Publisher Description

No adequate definition is possible till the properties of the thing to be defined are known. Previously we can define only the scope of the inquiry. Now, Logic has been considered as both the science of reasoning, i. e. the analysis of the mental process when we reason, and the art of reasoning, i. e. the rules for the process. The term reasoning, however, is not wide enough. Reasoning means either syllogising, or (and this is its truer sense) the drawing inferences from assertions already admitted. But the Aristotelian or Scholastic logicians included in Logic terms and propositions, and the Port Royal logicians spoke of it as equivalent to the art of thinking. Even popularly, accuracy of classification, and the extent of command over premisses, are thought clearer signs of logical powers than accuracy of deduction. On the other hand, the definition of logic as a 'science treating of the operations of the understanding in the search of truth', though wide enough, would err through including truths known from intuition; for, though doubtless many seeming intuitions are processes of inference, questions as to[Pg 2] what facts are real intuitions belong to Metaphysics, not to Logic.

GENRE
Non-Fiction
RELEASED
1926
1 January
LANGUAGE
EN
English
LENGTH
176
Pages
PUBLISHER
Public Domain
SIZE
176.4
KB

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