• HUF999.00

Publisher Description

"IT HAS OFTEN AND confidently been asserted that man's origin can never be known" observed Charles Darwin in The Descent of Man. But "it is those who know little, and not those who know much" he continued, "who so positively assert that this or that problem will never be solved by science." Indeed, in the October 2, 2009, issue of Science, anthropologists again demonstrated the over-whelming might of Darwin's dangerous idea. Reporting a 4.4 million-year-old hominin species first discovered in the Ethiopian Afar rift in 1992, Tim Whites international team announced that Ardipithecus ramidus "resolves many of the uncertainties about early human evolution, including the nature of the last common ancestor we shared with the line leading to living chimpanzees and bonobos." But 2009 was an exciting year for popular books on human evolution as well. Some deserved a great deal of attention; some not so much. Let's start with Darwinius masillae--remember "Ida"? On May 19 the world was introduced to the alleged "missing link" between primitive primates and humans--an exceptionally well-preserved, 47-million-year-old cat-sized fossil belonging to an extinct branch of early primates called adapiforms. As a team led by Jorn Hurum of the University of Oslo, Norway, released the PLoS One paper, Ida was ceremoniously unveiled at the American Museum of Natural History to an enthusiastic New York City audience including Mayor Michael Bloomberg. Science writer Colin Tudge's book, dubbed The Link: Uncovering Our Earliest Ancestors (Little, Brown and Co., 2009), quickly followed.

GENRE
Reference
RELEASED
2010
1 March
LANGUAGE
EN
English
LENGTH
8
Pages
PUBLISHER
American Humanist Association
SIZE
386.5
KB

More Books by The Humanist

2012
2012
2012
2012
2012
2012