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Descripción de editorial

The Xi'an Stele, erected in Tang China's capital in 781, describes in both Syriac and Chinese the existence of Christian communities in northern China. While scholars have so far considered the Stele exclusively in relation to the Chinese cultural and historical context, Todd Godwin here demonstrates that it can only be fully understood by reconstructing the complex connections that existed between the Church of the East, Sasanian aristocratic culture and the Tang Empire (617–907) between the fall of the Sasanian Persian Empire (225–651) and the birth of the Abbasid Caliphate (762–1258). Through close textual re-analysis of the Stele and by drawing on ancient sources in Syriac, Greek, Arabic and Chinese, Godwin demonstrates that Tang China (617–907) was a cosmopolitan milieu where multiple religious traditions, namely Buddhism, Zoroastrianism, Manichaeism and Christianity, formed zones of élite culture. Syriac Christianity in fact remained powerful in Persia throughout the period, and Christianity – not Zoroastrianism – was officially regarded by the Tang government as 'The Persian Religion'. Persian Christians at the Chinese Court uncovers the role played by Syriac Christianity in the economic and cultural integration of late Sasanian Iran and China, and is important reading for all scholars of the Church of the East, China and the Middle East in the medieval period.

GÉNERO
Historia
PUBLICADO
2018
enero 30
LENGUAJE
EN
Inglés
EXTENSIÓN
320
Páginas
EDITORIAL
I.B. Tauris
VENDEDOR
Bookwire GmbH
TAMAÑO
28.7
MB

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