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Descripción de editorial

Inclusive language remains a hot
topic. Despite decades of empirical evidence and revisions of formal language
use, many inclusive adaptations of English and German continue to be ignored
or contested. But how to convince speakers of the importance of inclusive
language? Rewriting Language provides
one possible answer: by engaging readers with the issue, literary texts can
help to raise awareness and thereby promote wider linguistic change.

Christiane Luck analyses
five iconic texts from a literary, linguistic and sociological perspective. She
shows how Ursula K. Le Guin’s The Left
Hand of Darkness
and Verena Stefan’s Häutungen
highlight the issues inherent in the linguistic status quo; Marge Piercy’s Woman on the Edge of Time and June
Arnold’s The Cook and the Carpenter
explore the possibilities and challenges of linguistic neutrality; and Gerd
Brantenberg’s Egalias døtre reverses
linguistic norms to illustrate the link between language and imagination. A
focus group study provides empirical evidence for the effectiveness of the
literary approaches and shows how literary texts can sensitise readers to the
impact of biased language. Particularly in the context of education, Luck
concludes, literary texts can be a valuable tool to promote inclusive language
use. 

GÉNERO
Técnicos y profesionales
PUBLICADO
2020
febrero 6
LENGUAJE
EN
Inglés
EXTENSIÓN
336
Páginas
EDITORIAL
UCL Press
VENDEDOR
Book Network Intl Limited
TAMAÑO
1
MB