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CONFIDENCE IN THE ABILITY TO CARRY out a specific set of behaviors, or self-efficacy (Bandura, 1982), is hypothesized to predict future success in the same behavioral domain. Others have expanded on Bandura's concept of self-efficacy and applied it to the field of addictions research (DiClemente, 1986; DiClemente et al., 1995; Marlatt and Gordon, 1985). As described by Witkiewitz and Marlatt (2004), self-efficacy is an important predictor of lapse or relapse to substance use after treatment, and higher self-efficacy to remain abstinent in high-risk situations should be associated with a greater likelihood of abstinence outcomes. Research on the treatment of alcohol-use disorders and, to a lesser extent, other substance-use disorders (SUDs), indicates that higher self-efficacy to abstain from all substance use at the beginning (Miller and Longabaugh, 2003; Rychtarik et al., 1992; Stephens et al., 1993) and end (Allsop et al., 2000; Goldbeck et al., 1997; Ilgen et al., 2005) of treatment is associated with more positive treatment outcomes. Distal posttreatment measures of abstinence self-efficacy also predict less subsequent substance use (McKay et al., 2005). Thus, a fairly consistent picture emerges whereby increases in self-efficacy precede and coincide with reductions in substance use. Given the general consistency of these findings, it is important to identify specific aspects of treatment that predict self-efficacy.

GENRE
Health & Well-Being
RELEASED
2007
January 1
LANGUAGE
EN
English
LENGTH
20
Pages
PUBLISHER
Alcohol Research Documentation, Inc.
SIZE
221.7
KB

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