Publisher Description

The Author of this very practical treatise on Scotch Loch - Fishing desires clearly that it may be of use to all who had it. He does not pretend to have written anything new, but to have attempted to put what he has to say in as readable a form as possible. Everything in the way of the history and habits of fish has been studiously avoided, and technicalities have been used as sparingly as possible. The writing of this book has afforded him pleasure in his leisure moments, and that pleasure would be much increased if he knew that the perusal of it would create any bond of sympathy between himself and the angling community in general. This section is interleaved with blank sheets for the reader’s notes. The Author need hardly say that any suggestions addressed to the case of the publishers, will meet with consideration in a future edition. We do not pretend to write or enlarge upon a new subject. Much has been said and written-and well said and written too on the art of fishing but loch-fishing has been rather looked upon as a second-rate performance, and to dispel this idea is one of the objects for which this present treatise has been written. Far be it from us to say anything against fishing, lawfully practiced in any form but many pent up in our large towns will bear us out when we say that, on the whole, a day’s loch-fishing is the most convenient. One great matter is, that the loch-fisher is dependent on nothing but enough wind to curl the water and on a large loch it is very seldom that a dead calm prevails all day, and can make his arrangements for a day, weeks beforehand whereas the stream- fisher is dependent for a good take on the state of the water and however pleasant and easy it may be for one living near the banks of a good trout stream or river, it is quite another matter to arrange for a day’s river-fishing, if one is looking forward to a holiday at a date some weeks ahead. Providence may favor the expectant angler with a good day, and the water in order but experience has taught most of us that the good days are in the minority, and that, as is the case with our rapid running streams, such as many of our northern streams are, the water is either too large or too small, unless, as previously remarked, you live near at hand, and can catch it at its best.

GENRE
History
RELEASED
1863
January 1
LANGUAGE
EN
English
LENGTH
85
Pages
PUBLISHER
Public Domain
SIZE
80.1
KB