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Publisher Description

Frances Perkins is no longer a household name, yet she was one of the most influential women of the twentieth century. Based on extensive archival materials, new documents, and exclusive access to Perkins's family members and friends, this biography is the first complete portrait of a devoted public servant with a passionate personal life, a mother who changed the landscape of American business and society.

Frances Perkins was named Secretary of Labor by Franklin Roosevelt in 1933. As the first female cabinet secretary, she spearheaded the fight to improve the lives of America's working people while juggling her own complex family responsibilities. Perkins's ideas became the cornerstones of the most important social welfare and legislation in the nation's history, including unemployment compensation, child labor laws, and the forty-hour work week. Her greatest triumph was creating Social Security.

Written with a wit that echoes Frances Perkins's own, award-winning journalist Kirstin Downey gives us a riveting exploration of how and why Perkins slipped into historical oblivion, and restores Perkins to her proper place in history.

GENRE
Biographies & Memoirs
NARRATOR
SE
Susan Ericksen
LENGTH
19:29
hr min
RELEASED
2016
April 12
PUBLISHER
Tantor Audio
LANGUAGE
EN
English
SIZE
903.2
MB

Customer Reviews

ekatherine25 ,

Frances?

Very informative book but why does the author refer to Perkins as “Frances” when the men are called by their last names? It was grating on the ears the whole way through.

Civics Geek ,

An important book

When I first encountered this book, I was blown away for not having known who Frances Perkins was. Learning that FDR's Secretary of Labor, in the 1930's and '40's, was a woman, and a social worker, blew my mind. This is an inspiring book about an important historical figure whose vision and work shaped the social safety network in the United States. A must read.

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