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Publisher Description

Book Three in the Magnificent Dune Chronicles—the Bestselling Science Fiction Adventure of All Time

The Children of Dune are twin siblings Leto and Ghanima Atreides, whose father, the Emperor Paul Muad’Dib, disappeared in the desert wastelands of Arrakis nine years ago. Like their father, the twins possess supernormal abilities—making them valuable to their manipulative aunt Alia, who rules the Empire in the name of House Atreides.

Facing treason and rebellion on two fronts, Alia’s rule is not absolute. The displaced House Corrino is plotting to regain the throne while the fanatical Fremen are being provoked into open revolt by the enigmatic figure known only as The Preacher. Alia believes that by obtaining the secrets of the twins’ prophetic visions, she can maintain control over her dynasty.

But Leto and Ghanima have their own plans for their visions—and their destinies....

GENRE
Fiction & Literature
RELEASED
1976
April 21
LANGUAGE
EN
English
LENGTH
416
Pages
PUBLISHER
Penguin Publishing Group
SELLER
PENGUIN GROUP USA, INC.
SIZE
2.3
MB

Customer Reviews

Mama jg ,

Excellent read...

Excellent read...

Prophet Amos ,

SLOW, BORING, AND TOO LONG

It was excessively long unnecessarily, sans much adventure with long boring mystical dialogue. It should have been only three hundred pages. It is painfully slow and boring, I will no longer read anymore of this series. I gave the series a try by reading the first three book, but no more, and I discourage anyone from reading them.

Other sci-fi guy ,

Drier than the Desert

I couldn't wait to finish this book. First, because I wanted to find out what it was about, but also to find out if all the endless dryness of the writing was worth the time spent struggling through it.
The last ten percent of the book did offer some sense of familiarity with the previous books but the other ninety percent was filled up with a Pingpong game of complicated political intrigue punctuated with annoying mythical dogma and stentorian pseudo-Arabic pronouncements.
All the drama was about dynasty, jihad, and brinksmanship with very little evidence of emotional content. None of the characters were developed enough to form any empathy with. Herbert has crafted an intricate saga of complicated ideas and motivations but very little of it is relatable on a human scale. I don't think I will be interested in continuing to stagger through the rest of this arid landscape.

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