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Publisher Description

Words, and pictures, exercises, videos…and inspiration.



 “Photographers don’t need to hope that Creativity will turn up. It’s there in all of us all the time. It’s something we are,” says photographer, writer, and teacher Sean Kernan.

Kernan’s book offers ways to get to creativity for photographers at all levels, bright beginner to jaded professional. It gives assignments that stimulate your visual imagination and change your pictures. These simple exercises engage your creativity and reclaim your discovery process, bringing back the excitement of that first time you took a photograph that was way beyond anything you thought you could do. 

Through guided steps, you transform classic photographic concerns – focus, composition, portraiture, and backgrounds – into a whole-body experience of awareness. This radical approach leads to deeper seeing and to photographs that are more awake and alive. 

GENRE
Arts & Entertainment
RELEASED
2014
September 17
LANGUAGE
EN
English
LENGTH
309
Pages
PUBLISHER
Looking Into The Light
SELLER
John Kernan
SIZE
235.3
MB

Customer Reviews

WorldwideHideout ,

Amazing Experience in a Book

Having had the good fortune of attending Sean Kernan’s workshops in the past, I am thrilled to see that so much of what I love about his teaching is contained in this book. With so mony books on creativity out there, this is the only approach that truly is written for those who are already “in the room”, who want to dig deeper and see where it will take them. Thank you.

Sean Kernan ,

Looking into the Light: Creativity and the Photographer

Sean’s methods are very unlike other photo instructors, and it’s difficult to fully understand where his teachings lead you, until that is, you arrive at the creative destination. He is capable of sparking a revelation and making your eye brows raise & furrow in equal measure.

Garin Horner ,

Insightful Photography Book

I enjoyed this book and its uniquely creative perspective. Its a book that invites photographers to not only become more creative in photography, but also to grow as human beings. I think this book can help photographers find connections between their photography and themselves. Developing one's creativity is a noble effort, but the writing here leads us even further, toward self-awareness (the source of one's creativity?). Kernan's voice is a much needed guide for photographers that want more than the scattershot approach to making images. Creativity and Photography challenges photography and its photographers to aspire to be something more.