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The current investigation employed a multiple-baseline design to evaluate the effects of joint-control training as a method of phonics instruction. Three children with autism participated in this study, two males (ages 6 and 9) and a female (age 8). The participants were exposed to two types of instruction (i.e., tact training and joint-control training). In tact training, participants were presented with a sound card randomly until all four sound cards (Set 1) were presented 10 times in a given session (i.e., a total of 40 trials). In each trial, the experimenter presented a sound card to the participant and asked, “What sound?” If the participant emitted the correct sound, the experimenter delivered praise and a reinforcer. If the participant emitted the incorrect sound, the experimenter provided up to three additional prompts (i.e., “The sound is ____. What sound?”) before moving on to the subsequent trial. In joint-control training, participants were randomly presented a letter sound prior to being presented with a corresponding sound card randomly until all four sound cards (Set 2) were presented 10 times in a given session. The experimenter presented a letter sound and immediately after the participant imitated the sound, the experimenter presented the sound card to the participant and asked “What sound?” If the participant emitted the correct sound, the experimenter delivered praise and a reinforcer. Three additional prompts were provided if the participant did not imitate the sound after the experimenter presented a letter sound and/or if the participant did not emit the correct sound after the experimenter presented a sound card and asked “What sound?” A probe session was conducted immediately after each tact and joint-control training session. Probe sessions were identical to the training sessions except that no additional prompts were given. Results showed that both tact training and joint-control training were effective in producing letter-sound bi-directionality, indicating that both methods may be used for phonics instruction for children with autism. Furthermore, teachers who completed the social validity questionnaires reported that the goals, procedures, and outcomes were acceptable and important.

GENRE
Professional & Technical
RELEASED
2013
May 18
LANGUAGE
EN
English
LENGTH
208
Pages
PUBLISHER
BiblioLife
SELLER
Creative Media, LLC
SIZE
17
MB