Publisher Description

The Emergency Handbook brings together recommendations from national emergency response agencies and major universities into one easy-to-understand, interactive reference.  It addresses nearly 50 disaster preparation and recovery topics in four broad categories, including: People and Pets, Home and Business, Landscape and Garden, and Farms and Livestock.

 

Southern states can experience some of the most violent weather extremes on earth.  A typical year may include hurricanes, lightening, tornadoes, flash flooding, ice and snow.  Alabama Extension and WSFA-TV, Montgomery, AL prepared this resource to help families, business and communities prepare for storms and clean up after they pass.

 

Preparation topics

•  Stock the basics for emergencies

•  Caregivers guide for sheltering and evacuating

•  Caring for pets during storms and evacuations

•  Helping children cope

•  Food storage charts – indicating how long food is safe to eat after the power goes out

•  And more…

 

Recovery topics

•  Personal safety after a storm

•  Threats from Fire Ants, snakes and other wildlife after a storm

•   Reentering and cleaning up a flooded home

•   Recovering family treasures

•    Saving damaged trees 

•   And more…

 

Contributors include: Alabama Extension, Auburn University, Alabama A&M University, Alabama Emergency Management Association, American Red Cross, Environmental Protection Agency, Extension Disaster Education Network, eXtension, Federal Emergency Management Agency, Mississippi State Extension, National Weather Service, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Texas A&M AgriLife, University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Kentucky Cooperative Extension, University of Minnesota, and the University of Missouri.

GENRE
Professional & Technical
RELEASED
2015
July 30
LANGUAGE
EN
English
LENGTH
146
Pages
PUBLISHER
Alabama Extension at Auburn University
SELLER
Auburn University
SIZE
308.6
MB

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