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Publisher Description

The real story of how the federal government finally apprehended and convicted America’s most notorious criminal, Al Capone.

Drawing on recently discovered government documents, wiretap transcripts, and Al Capone’s handwritten personal letters, New York Times bestselling author Jonathan Eig tells the dramatic story of the rise and fall of the nation’s most infamous criminal in rich new detail.

From the moment he arrived in Chicago in 1920, Capone found himself in a world with limitless opportunity. Within a few years Capone controlled an illegal bootlegging business with annual revenue rivaling that of some of the nation’s largest corporations. Along the way he corrupted the Chicago police force and local courts while becoming one of the world’s first international celebrities. Legend credits Eliot Ness and his “Untouchables” with apprehending Capone, but Eig shows that this wasn’t so. In Get Capone, the man known as “Scarface” emerges as a complex man, doomed as much by his ego as by his vicious criminality. This is the real Al Capone.

GENRE
Nonfiction
RELEASED
2010
April 27
LANGUAGE
EN
English
LENGTH
480
Pages
PUBLISHER
Simon & Schuster
SELLER
SIMON AND SCHUSTER DIGITAL SALES INC
SIZE
9.6
MB

Customer Reviews

Sportscafe ,

Get Capone

The Book seems to be a very Good on Details and Not like Some Books That have you wondering if what is written is True Or Not.you will Not be able to put down until you read all of it.Pictures are Great

Drazowsky ,

Very Good, But...

I really love Erik Larson's work. The reason being, Larson will not print a word of text unless it can be proven, established, sourced. Eig does a great job, but there were times he stretched the descriptive without any established sources. To say that the wind whipped through this person's hair, or this person thought that he...blah, blah, is conjecture unless it's established as factually having happened.

When an author posits without stating where he or she got that information I tune out, I question, I pull back from this "truthful" narrative.

I liked the book. I only wish Eig didn't try so hard.

Rick McNeely ,

Not Bad

Exhaustively researched, well-documented. Suffers from an awkward writing style that jumps from recitation to sensation. There are many worse, and highly inaccurate, books about the Gangster Era, so you might dive in if this sort of history interests you. Eig has trouble making his many characters come to life, but his depictions of the Roaring Twenties in general are very good.

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