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Publisher Description

The Harvard Law Review, April 2015, is offered in a digital edition. Contents include the annual Developments in the Law survey of a particular area of legal concern; this year's topic is Policing. Other contents include: 


* Article, "Consent Procedures and American Federalism," by Bridget Fahey      

* Essay, "Anticipatory Remedies for Takings," by Thomas W. Merrill   

* Book Review, "How a 'Lawless' China Made Modern America: An Epic Told in Orientalism," by Carol G.S. Tan 


Specific subjects studied in 'Developments in the Law - Policing' are: Policing and Profit, Policing Students, Policing Immigrant Communities, and Considering Police Body Cameras. 

    

In addition, the issue features student commentary on Recent Cases, including such subjects as: business judgment rule and mergers; whistleblowing under Dodd-Frank and extraterritoriality; senate redistricting in New York; postmortem rights of publicity; standing and overlap of various tests used; informing one who pleads No Contest of collateral consequences; exceptions to marriage license requirement for out-of-state marriages; exclusionary rule for violations of Posse Comitatus restrictions; and extending federal forced labor statute to conduct criminalized under state law. Finally, the issue features several summaries of Recent Publications. 


The Harvard Law Review is a student-run organization whose primary purpose is to publish a journal of legal scholarship. The Review comes out monthly from November through June and has roughly 2500 pages per volume. The organization is formally independent of the Harvard Law School. Student editors make all editorial and organizational decisions. This issue of the Review is Apr. 2015, the sixth issue of academic year 2014-2015 (Volume 128). The digital edition features active Contents, linked notes, and proper ebook and Bluebook formatting.

GENRE
Professional & Technical
RELEASED
2015
April 9
LANGUAGE
EN
English
LENGTH
324
Pages
PUBLISHER
Quid Pro Books
SELLER
Quid Pro, LLC
SIZE
2
MB

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