• $11.99

Publisher Description

No longer the simple machines they used to be, the modern motorcycle is as complex and diverse as the modern car. In an ever more competitive market, manufacturers are looking for new solutions to old problems – what’s the most efficient transmission? How can emissions and fuel consumption be cut without affecting power? And how can new models be differentiated from one another?

This book explains how the modern motorcycle works, in a straightforward style that’s jargon-free and easy to read. It assumes no prior mechanical knowledge, simply an interest in a motorcycle’s workings, and an open mind. The text is accompanied by superb cutaway illustrations from the major motorcycle manufacturers, clearly showing how individual components and systems function. 

It covers the latest innovations, including traction control and pushbutton gear change, as well as long-established technologies, such as fuel injection and ABS.

How your motorcycle works will not transform you into a motorcycle engineer or expert mechanic, but in explaining precisely how everything works, it will increase your understanding, and thus enjoyment, of the machine.

GENRE
Nonfiction
RELEASED
2013
November 22
LANGUAGE
EN
English
LENGTH
80
Pages
PUBLISHER
Veloce Publishing Ltd
SELLER
Veloce Publishing Limited
SIZE
12.5
MB

Customer Reviews

Corwin K ,

Motorcycle 101, A+

This was exactly what I was looking for. After being inspired by Zen and the art of Motorcycle maintenance, I've been on a mission to increase my mechanical knowledge, specifically with motorcycles. This book assumes the starting point of zero mechanical know-how and then clearly and quite thoroughly walks you from A to Z through the workings of motorcycles. Something I found extremely helpfully was not only the explanation of the various parts but there role in the greater system. The pictures were clear and very helpfully labeled. No mechanical topic was missing a diagram or photo or both. I have spent twice as much on other guides and this one has been far superior. I have every intention of reading again for better familiarity and recommend it to any motorcycle or mechanical enthusiast.

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