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Publisher Description

Using data from a nation-wide survey of graduates undertaken in 2003, this article tests the screening hypothesis for the graduate job market by investigating the relationship among job search channels, educational level and the results of job searches. It is found that those at a lower educational level are more likely to choose informal channels. This is supportive of the screening hypothesis, since those with higher levels of education have a stronger signal and fewer motivations to use informal channels. Meanwhile, the effect of educational background on the probabilities of obtaining a job does not change with different search channels. This empirical result seems to reject the screening hypothesis. However, based on a discussion of the methods, we reach conclusions supportive of the screening hypothesis. Introduction

GENRE
Nonfiction
RELEASED
2008
September 1
LANGUAGE
EN
English
LENGTH
24
Pages
PUBLISHER
East Asian Institute, National University of Singapore
SELLER
The Gale Group, Inc., a Delaware corporation and an affiliate of Cengage Learning, Inc.
SIZE
215.5
KB

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