• $11.99

Publisher Description

The lives of a sixteen-year-old Nigerian orphan and a well-off British woman collide in this page-turning #1 New York Times bestseller and book club favorite from Chris Cleave.

We don’t want to tell you too much about this book. It is a truly special story and we don’t want to spoil it. Nevertheless, you need to know something, so we will just say this: It is extremely funny, but the African beach scene is horrific. The story starts there, but the book doesn’t. And it’s what happens afterward that is most important. Once you have read it, you’ll want to tell everyone about it. When you do, please don’t tell them what happens either. The magic is in how it unfolds.

GENRE
Fiction & Literature
RELEASED
2009
February 10
LANGUAGE
EN
English
LENGTH
320
Pages
PUBLISHER
Simon & Schuster
SELLER
SIMON AND SCHUSTER DIGITAL SALES INC
SIZE
8.7
MB

Customer Reviews

Robyncho ,

A good read

This was definitely an interesting reading experience. First few chapters were better than the later chapters, in terms of smoothness of the story and how it captured my attention. I found this book really haunting and sad. Not very funny, almost depressing. However, it definitely made me think. About the ending, I also was not 100% satisfied with how it ended, but, when I went back to read the last chapter again, it kind of made sense to me, why the author wanted to end it that way. It really is about how the characters transform (or not) throughout the story, not how it ends. I definitely recommend this book.

Ash3ley ,

Yuck!

Was mad about all the hype. Don't waste your time & money. I kept turning the page thinking it was going to get better... It didn't.

DeeAvidReader ,

It was okay

I liked this book fine, just didn't fall in love with it. Can't really explain why I didn't love it, just felt a little incomplete. Not terrible by any means, I guess I just expected more from the "hook" of the review that promised such a wondrous, surprising read and I feel that it fell just a little short.

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