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RESEARCH FINDINGS HAVE INDICATED THAT PHYSICAL attractiveness is associated with positive life outcomes (see Averett and Korenman 1996; Haworth-Hoeppner 2000). Blum (2003) proposed, "there's an expectation in our culture that the better you look, the more access to love and happiness you'll have" (p. 27). The value placed on physical attractiveness has become particularly evident in a consumer culture that promotes ideals of bodily perfection (Davis 2002; Featherstone 1991; Frank 2002). Not surprisingly, it has been argued that obsession with physical appearance is growing in intensity (Davis 2002; Gill, Henwood, and McLean 2005). Historically, having appearance concerns defied normative notions of masculinities (Carrigan, Connell, and Lee 1985; Connell 1995)--such concerns were stereotypically associated with women (Davis 2002). More recently, researchers have found that men too experience appearance concerns (Gill et al. 2005; Gullette 1994; Pope, Phillips, and Olivardia 2000). Yet, sociologists have yet to examine the role of hair in regards to these concerns. The present study investigated the role of hair in self-identification and as a source of body satisfaction or dissatisfaction among 14 Canadian men. Utilizing Connell's (1987, 1995) theory of hegemonic masculinity and understandings of consumerism (Featherstone 1991), the dominant understandings of hair among men were explored. Findings suggest hair plays a role in shaping perceptions of masculinity, appearance, and identification, which are largely intertwined. Findings are discussed in relation to consumerism and masculinities.

GENRE
Nonfiction
RELEASED
2011
May 1
LANGUAGE
EN
English
LENGTH
37
Pages
PUBLISHER
Canadian Sociological Association
SELLER
The Gale Group, Inc., a Delaware corporation and an affiliate of Cengage Learning, Inc.
SIZE
228
KB

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