Publisher Description

This book is about the ancient Music who it was written and stored. It was written in a scrawl impossible to decipher up to the thirteenth century, when Plain Song 1 (Plain Chant) made its appearance in square and diamond-shaped notes. The graduals and introits had not yet been reduced to bars, but the songs of the troubadours appear to have been in bars of three beats with the accent on the feeble note of each bar. However, the theory that this bar of three beats or triple time was used exclusively is probably erroneous. St. Isidore, in his treatise on music, speaking of how Plain Song should be interpreted, considers in turn all the voices and recommends those which are high, sweet and clear, for the execution of vocal sounds, introits, graduals, offertories, etc. This is exactly contrary to what we now do, since in place of utilizing these light tenor voices for Plain Song, we have recourse to voices both heavy and low.

GENRE
Arts & Entertainment
RELEASED
1921
January 1
LANGUAGE
EN
English
LENGTH
20
Pages
PUBLISHER
Public Domain
SELLER
Public Domain
SIZE
219.6
KB

Customer Reviews

Elias Nesser ,

On the Execution of Music, and Principally of Ancient Music

I read this book in a day. It gave a well written account on the ancient masters of music. The works of Bach, Chopin, and Mozart (to name a few) have been rewritten to the liking of those who have collected their works. The instruments of their time differ greatly from those of today as well as the technique of their execution. A very good read for a beginning musician.

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