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Publisher Description

As featured in the documentary All In: The Fight for Democracy



Finalist for the PEN/John Kenneth Galbraith Award for Nonfiction

Longlisted for the National Book Award in Nonfiction

Named one of the Best Books of the Year by:

Washington Post * Boston Globe * NPR* Bustle * BookRiot * New York Public Library



From the award-winning, New York Times bestselling author of White Rage, the startling--and timely--history of voter suppression in America, with a foreword by Senator Dick Durbin.



In her New York Times bestseller White Rage, Carol Anderson laid bare an insidious history of policies that have systematically impeded black progress in America, from 1865 to our combustible present. With One Person, No Vote, she chronicles a related history: the rollbacks to African American participation in the vote since the 2013 Supreme Court decision that eviscerated the Voting Rights Act of 1965. Known as the Shelby ruling, this decision effectively allowed districts with a demonstrated history of racial discrimination to change voting requirements without approval from the Department of Justice.



Focusing on the aftermath of Shelby, Anderson follows the astonishing story of government-dictated racial discrimination unfolding before our very eyes as more and more states adopt voter suppression laws. In gripping, enlightening detail she explains how voter suppression works, from photo ID requirements to gerrymandering to poll closures. And with vivid characters, she explores the resistance: the organizing, activism, and court battles to restore the basic right to vote to all Americans.

GENRE
Politics & Current Events
RELEASED
2018
September 11
LANGUAGE
EN
English
LENGTH
288
Pages
PUBLISHER
Bloomsbury Publishing
SELLER
Bookwire GmbH
SIZE
4.3
MB

Customer Reviews

Josey86 ,

Not Safe for Fact or Science Deniers

A truly astonishing look at just how far some people will go to win an election. It’s a shocking read, but it’s not something we can change if we don’t know how far it goes. Luckily, it ends on a hopeful note. Required reading for everyone who loves democracy.

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