• $7.99

Publisher Description

Afghan-American journalist Fariba Nawa delivers a revealing and deeply personal exploration of Afghanistan and the drug trade which rules the country, from corrupt officials to warlords and child brides and beyond. Khaled Hosseini, author of The Kite Runner and A Thousand Splendid Suns calls Opium Nation “an insightful and informative look at the global challenge of Afghan drug trade. Fariba Nawa weaves her personal story of reconnecting with her homeland after 9/11 with a very engaging narrative that chronicles Afghanistan’s dangerous descent into opium trafficking…and most revealingly, how the drug trade has damaged the lives of ordinary Afghan people.” Readers of Gayle Lemmon Tzemach’s The Dressmaker of Khair Khana and Rory Stewart’s The Places Between will find Nawa’s personal, piercing, journalistic tale to be an indispensable addition to the cultural criticism covering this dire global crisis.

GENRE
History
RELEASED
2011
November 8
LANGUAGE
EN
English
LENGTH
368
Pages
PUBLISHER
Harper Perennial
SELLER
HARPERCOLLINS PUBLISHERS
SIZE
11.8
MB

Customer Reviews

Nawid A ,

Solid Read

I'm not sure what the other review is about, this certainly isn't about the author living in USA.

The summary of the book as provided by iTunes is more accurate.

Enjoyable read, I especially enjoyed the history of Afghanistan bits.

Praematura ,

Boring

The title of this book is so misleading. The book is an autobiography of some unknown Muslim woman growing up in USA and the impact on her and to a far lesser extent Afghanistan. The author places a few references about opium in Afghanistan but the majority of the content is her viewpoint being an Afghan refugee in the USA. It's rarely insightful about anything.

Usually I keep books in my library but this is rubbish. I could see if she was someone important or she had some insight to offer but an autobiography from a completely unknown person has no appeal. The author is just an average nobody who fled Afghanistan at 5 and returns to Afghanistan in her early 20s. The book talks vividly about her memory in 4th grade etc... BORING.

Buyer beware...

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