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Publisher Description

Oryx and Crake is at once an unforgettable love story and a compelling vision of the future. Snowman, known as Jimmy before mankind was overwhelmed by a plague, is struggling to survive in a world where he may be the last human, and mourning the loss of his best friend, Crake, and the beautiful and elusive Oryx whom they both loved. In search of answers, Snowman embarks on a journey–with the help of the green-eyed Children of Crake–through the lush wilderness that was so recently a great city, until powerful corporations took mankind on an uncontrolled genetic engineering ride. Margaret Atwood projects us into a near future that is both all too familiar and beyond our imagining.

From the Trade Paperback edition.

GENRE
Fiction & Literature
RELEASED
2004
March 30
LANGUAGE
EN
English
LENGTH
400
Pages
PUBLISHER
Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
SELLER
Penguin Random House LLC
SIZE
7.5
MB

Customer Reviews

SicTransit983 ,

One of the best books I've read

This was an option to read for my highschool AP class. When I read the info about it I was interested in reading this. I was so happy I read it because it was the only book I actually completely read in that class and enjoyed, and that means a lot considering I have A.D.D and can't STAND to read. Easily my favorite book.

Sekhmet Three ,

Oryx and Crake

Unbelievable in it's nerve, riveting and not put downable!
I didn't start out to read it....I was planning on Atwood's Maddadam but when I read that Maddadam was third in a trilogy, I semi-grudgingly started with the first in the trilogy. I'm so glad I did.

I have now read all three in record time and they are not even 'my type' of genre. But the writing, fabulous story and lush vocabulary hooked me at once.....and has stayed with me....I don't want to start anything literary yet...I am having trilogy hangover!

JRubino ,

100 Words or Less

Atwood creates complicated worlds. When it works, you don’t even noticing while accepting the future she builds.

But when it doesn’t work, as in this novel, nothing holds together. Sections here are so well done, but the connections to other chapters, to the novel as a whole, are missing. Frankly, I think it’s due to the length. The novel seems half complete, as if large swaths of details have been glossed over.

That’s disappointing. It’s not bad. It’s only half-baked, I think. I suppose that’s a weird review: “I didn’t like it because I wanted more.” But there it is.

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