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Publisher Description

In the tradition of Fast Food Nation and The Omnivore’s Dilemma comes an “indispensable,” (New York Newsday) fascinating, and cutting-edge look from the author of The Magic Feather Effect at the scary truth about what really goes into our food.

If a piece of individually wrapped cheese can retain its shape, color, and texture for years, what does it say about the food we eat and feed to our children?

Former New York Times business reporter and mother Melanie Warner decided to explore that question when she observed the phenomenon of the indestructible cheese. She began an investigative journey that took her to research labs, university food science departments, and factories around the country. What she discovered provides a rare, eye-opening—and sometimes disturbing—account of what we’re really eating. Warner looks at how decades of food science have resulted in the cheapest, most abundant, most addictive, and most nutritionally inferior food in the world, and she uncovers startling evidence about the profound health implications of the packaged and fast foods that we eat on a daily basis.

Combining meticulous research, vivid writing, and cultural analysis, Warner blows the lid off the largely undocumented—and lightly regulated—world of chemically treated and processed foods and lays bare the potential price we may pay for consuming even so-called healthy foods.

GENRE
Nonfiction
RELEASED
2013
February 26
LANGUAGE
EN
English
LENGTH
288
Pages
PUBLISHER
Scribner
SELLER
SIMON AND SCHUSTER DIGITAL SALES INC
SIZE
3.8
MB

Customer Reviews

Roxana001 ,

Good information

I liked this book as it presented me with knowledge on the food industry that I did not already have. It's quite amazing how "scientific" our food actually is! The book left me wanting more, it was a pretty short book. Either way it was well written and informative.

Frozen Inertia ,

Very Insightful

While a lot has been written about the food industry, not much has been discussed about processed food. Probably due to the complexity in that you almost need to have a chemistry degree to truly understand what you're eating - even beyond the likely culprits (the soy chapter was surprising). Pandora's lunchbox does a great job of this, and in looking at all angles of the implications. I highly recommend this book!

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