Publisher Description

It is a history book. To relate the history of the Philadelphia magazines is to tell the story of Philadelphia literature. The story is not a stately nor a splendid one, but it is exceedingly instructive. It helps to exhibit the process of American literature as an evolution, and it illustrates perilous and important chapters in American history. For a hundred years Pennsylvania was the seat of the ripest culture in America. The best libraries were to be found here, and the earliest and choicest reprints of Latin and English classics were made here. James Logan, a man of gentle nature and a scholar of rare attainments, had gathered at Stenton a library that comprehended books 'so scarce that neither price nor prayers could purchase them. ' John Davis, the satirical English traveller, who said of Princeton that it was 'a place more famous for its college than its learning, ' did justice, despite of his own nature, to Logan and to Philadelphia when he wrote: 'The Greek and Roman authors, forgotten on their native banks of the Ilissus and Tiber, delight by the kindness of a Logan the votaries to learning on those of the Delaware". The eagerness of Philadelphia social circles for each new thing in literature enabled booksellers to import large supplies from England and to undertake splendid editions of notable books. Dr. Johnson was made to feel amiable for a moment toward America on being presented with a copy of Rasselas bearing a Philadelphia imprint.

GENRE
History
RELEASED
1907
January 1
LANGUAGE
EN
English
LENGTH
186
Pages
PUBLISHER
Public Domain
SELLER
Public Domain
SIZE
134.4
KB