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Publisher Description

“Oh what a tangled web we weave…”


Kesh fled Faerie as a queen killer. Now she returns as the Faerie King’s secret obsession. But on Faerie, nothing is as it seems, not even Kesh herself. 


With days to stop Arran’s execution and the stoic guardian, Sirius, as her constant shadow, Kesh must weave her lies deep within Faerie’s courts where magic and whispers combine and conspire. Soon, Kesh learns there is more at stake than Arran’s life. Faerie is dying. Oberon’s reign is crumbling. The time to strike against the fae is now. But with Talen, Kellee and Sota a thousand light-years away, Kesh cannot succeed alone… 


Beneath the courtly politics, the glittering facades, and the King’s fragile hold on his people, the Dreamweaver is locked in eternal slumber, dreaming of the day his Queen of Hearts will set him free… because he knows, Kesh Lasota has no other choice. 


Kesh survived the Dreamweaver once before. Now all she has to do is control him. 


But Faerie's Dreamweaver has other ideas for the peoples’ Messenger. He knows who, and what Kesh really is and he has every intention of using her to make all his dreams come true. 


He takes your mind, makes it his, takes your soul, makes you cruel. 

Dare you answer the Dreamweaver’s call?


The "mind-blowing" fae-in-space bestselling series continues in Prince of Dreams, Messenger Chronicles #4


Reader note: The Messenger Series is professionally edited and proofread for your reading enjoyment.


Series Reading Order:

Shoot the Messenger, #1

Game of Lies, #2 

The Nightshade's Touch, #3

Prince of Dreams, #4

Her Dark Legion, #5 - coming late 2019.

GENRE
Sci-Fi & Fantasy
RELEASED
2019
May 13
LANGUAGE
EN
English
LENGTH
424
Pages
PUBLISHER
Crazy Ace
SELLER
Phillippa Lancaster
SIZE
3.2
MB

Customer Reviews

math wizard ,

Kesh’s Deals

I will say this is an awesome story! Five stars is not enough and even 10 barely begins to cover it! There is so much going on in this book and such plot twist and surprises. Kesh, Kellee and Talen have been separated for most of this book. Deals are made , betrayals will occur but the secrets revealed will surprise you! But when Kesh, Kellee and Talen come together again you will get plenty of food for thought. Sota is such an interesting character but he has his strong moments and can be such a funny character
The mad prince/ Dreamweaver is such a slick character, he is not trust worthy. By the title of the book you know he is a key player but I would have said what he wanted to hear ( lie) and do what was necessary to get what I wanted done.
Read this very interesting book as I do highly recommend it so you can see all that is going on and groan, laugh, and cry with the rest of us!

PalatableDinner ,

Prince of Dreams

Good writing knows when to show and when to tell. This book is almost all tell, and a lot of what is being told is recap, making this a stale read. It also continues to rehash trust issues without being proofread as well as its predecessors.

The story contained a lot of strange logic. Kellee deduces Sirius didn’t drug Kesh because he had more integrity than that, when there’s no way he could’ve known Kesh wouldn’t drink in book 3. He also wonders if Kesh ever saw Talen control humans, forgetting about Natalie from book 1, and says they kept tek to a minimum in the prison to avoid Talen losing control, but previous books state that he didn’t know he was the Nightshade until recently. Kesh chooses to continue pushing Sirius’ buttons even after he agreed to help her, and for some reason Oberon let Sjora keep the thimble for a thousand years. In book 2, Kesh claimed to have heard the Hunt once, but that isn’t possible in light of information here.

It’s also hard to take a fight seriously when opponents pause to monologue or argue with each other. The existence of the lifegivers that revived Aeon takes the wind out of any threats of death Kesh faces on Faerie, while any sense of urgency is diminished by all of Kesh’s screwing around. I have completely lost interest in Kesh after this book. Sirius straight up said Ailish would be there and when she asks if she knows her name, Kesh, who is under no duress, says she has no idea. There were numerous other things but this was the last straw for me.

As someone who has previously considered self-harm, explored mental health, and spent time with others who had similar thoughts on their journeys, Kesh’s moment felt cheap, like it was thrown in without much thought for the sake of adding a few pages of drama. The way Kellee talks about Arron’s suicidal desires is also problematic.

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