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Publisher Description

I. A dance ethnographer inevitably raises her hand to speak up for movement as the mediating factor in the relationship between writing and embodiment. Human movement creates inscriptions, whether with stone tools, pens and pencils, linotype machines, or computers. Orthographic systems travel through our bodies not only as symbols but as physical impulses like muscle contractions and extensions, creating complex movements and kinesthetic sensations. While European and American philosophers have long been concerned with the visual perception of movement, they have largely ignored awareness of movement sensation, or kinesthesia, as an epistemological mode. Omitted from the sensorium, kinesthesia is nonetheless a primary means by which we know, engage with, and make sense of the world. My discussion of orthography and embodiment builds upon this premise to suggest ways that language implicates kinesthesia, thereby troubling the notion of a disconnect between disembodied sign and sensate body.

GENRE
Nonfiction
RELEASED
2009
January 1
LANGUAGE
EN
English
LENGTH
26
Pages
PUBLISHER
Institute for Ethnographic Research
SELLER
The Gale Group, Inc., a Delaware corporation and an affiliate of Cengage Learning, Inc.
SIZE
273.2
KB

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