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Publisher Description

In the early 1970s, Australian governments began to treat Aborigines and Torres Strait Islanders as "peoples" with capacities for self-government. Forty years later, confidence in Indigenous self-determination has been eroded by accounts of Indigenous pathology, misplaced policy optimism, and persistent socio-economic gaps. This record accounts for this shift by arguing that Australian thinking about the Indigenous is a continuing, unresolvable tussle between the ideas of "peoples" and "population." Offering snapshots of moments in the last 40 years in these tensions are palpable — from honoring the heritage to quantifying the disadvantage and from acknowledging colonization’s destruction to projecting Indigenous recovery from it—this book not only if a settler colonial state can instruct the colonized in the arts of self-government, but also how could it justify doing anything less.

GENRE
History
RELEASED
2012
November 1
LANGUAGE
EN
English
LENGTH
272
Pages
PUBLISHER
Aboriginal Studies Press
SELLER
Chicago Review Press, Inc. DBA Independent Publishers Group
SIZE
1.1
MB