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STEALTH WARFARE ... DECLASSIFIED


DID RUSSIA GET SECRET US STEALTH TECHNOLOGY FROM A DOWNED STEALTH FIGHTER?


IS THE FORMER SOVIET UNION USING ACQUIRED US STEALTH TECH TO CREATE A NEW GENERATION OF NUCLEAR WEAPONS?


DID THE NAZI SCIENTiSTS WORKING FOR HITLER'S THIRD REICH DEVELOP A STEALTH AIRCRAFT THAT WAS USED AS A BASIS FOR US STEALTH DEVELOPMENT?


IS STEALTH TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPING NEW SUPERWEAPONS AND SUPERPLANES FOR FUTURE CONFLICTS?


ARE UFO'S CONNECTED WITH STEALTH?


THESE AND OTHER QUESTIONS WILL BE ANSWERED IN DAVID ALEXANDER'S STEALTH WARFARE, THE ONLY BOOK OF ITS KIND EVER WRITTEN.


In Stealth Warfare, a work that began as a classified study toward establishing developmental priorities toward the year 2030, bestselling author and globally recognized defense analyst and consultant David Alexander has framed the essence of stealth warfare from its mythological beginnings with the Trojan Horse to the modern technological marvels of stealth aircraft, submarines, and satellites.


From the foreword by Col. John G. Lackey (Ret.), US Army:


[David Alexander's] groundbreaking Stealth Warfare is a singular achievement -- by far the most comprehensive open source reference to this field of military endeavor you will find – now and probably ever. Even with those classified, eyes-only portions removed for reasons of national security, it stands as an unparalleled reference source for the military professional as well as historians or the casual reader, and reads like the best fiction to boot


In this epochal work, author David Alexander has skillfully outlined the history of stealth warfare, carefully weaving it into the American military genre by focusing on specific, carefully chosen warfare events, beginning with basic soldiering and ending with modern stealth aircraft, submarines, missiles, mines, drones, robots and the individual combatants’ battlefield equipment.


Perhaps the most striking aspect of Alexander’s Stealth Warfare is his account of those technical realities that are so vividly described from the beginnings of high-altitude reconnaissance programs such as U-2 and SR-71, as well as overhead satellite surveillance programs like Corona. The understanding gained from the tactical histories and operational capabilities of the F-117A Nighthawk and B-2 strategic bomber provides an understanding of the vast superiority which the United States has in the air in regard to stealth technology.


           "The push to develop stealth aircraft was to be crowned by Goering's "thousand by thousand by thousand" directive, which was Luftwaffe shorthand for the need to build an aircraft capable of flying a thousand kilometers carrying a thousand kilograms of weapons at a thousand kilometers per hour.

This ambitious master plan went hand in hand with the effort to develop a nuclear weapon that the plane would carry. The main goal of a long-range intercontinental bomber of this type would be to strike the United States."

 -- Excerpt from Stealth Warfare by author David Alexander 


           "The Luftwaffe's orders called for an initial production run of twenty of the first Ho IX design. During flight tests of the Ho prototypes an astounding discovery was made -- the all-wing aircraft failed to show up accurately on radar. Radar echoes bouncing off the Ho's airframe produced indistinct radar signatures more consistent with those returned by flocks of birds than by man-made aircraft.

At first this discrepancy was deemed a result of equipment failure, but it was soon discovered that the flying wing shape of the airframe itself was deflecting radar beams and dissipating the strength of returning echoes. The result was an image on radar scopes that was far weaker, and therefore far smaller, than would have ordinarily been expected."

 -- Excerpt from Stealth Warfare by author David Alexander


           "Lockheed aircraft designer Ben Rich, who worked for Clarence "Kelly" Johnson at Lockheed's Skunk Works wrote that "a low observable aircraft has to be good in six disciplines -- radar, infrared, noise, smoke, contrails and visibility -- otherwise you flunk the course." 

That these considerations figured in postwar advanced aircraft designs is self-evident even just from the standpoint of fuselage designs -- stealth is right in front of you if you have eyes to see it. Though the aerospace industry and the Pentagon tried to keep stealth research secret stealth was always part of the program.

As mentioned earlier, the bulk of the programs of this era were black, that is, clandestine projects. Even those few projects whose existence was grudgingly revealed, such as the U-2 and A-12/SR-71 Blackbird family spy planes, were never entirely declassified. 

As Churchill observed, in war the truth must sometimes be protected by a bodyguard of lies. Divulging information about critical capabilities of military aircraft can and will give adversaries valuable clues to countermeasures it can use against them. For this reason it has to be assumed that a great deal of deliberate disinformation surrounds even the most familiar of white world projects. 

Another reason for the secrecy that cloaked special postwar aircraft projects is that much of it was based on captured prototypes and research done by Nazi technicians, many of whom were now working in the US under government auspices and official protection. 

Public recognition of these facts so soon after the war would have aroused a national outcry. The intelligence and defense establishments who had put those ex-Nazis to work needed to avoid such a scenario.

A cloak of secrecy also surrounds the technology transfer issues that gave rise to postwar advanced aircraft programs. At the close of World War Two the United States came out the winner in a race by the three victorious Allied powers to grab the cream of Nazi weapons technology and the Reich's brain trust."

   -- Excerpt from Stealth Warfare by author David Alexander


           "One of the most sensitive military secrets of the Cold War is that in the early 1960s the Macmillan government in the UK turned over to the Kennedy administration virtually everything that the British knew about stealth technology, and it was a considerable amount. The British didn’t then have the material resources to develop this technology, but the US, with its vast, virtually unlimited industrial capacity and bottomless money pit, very much did. The stealth relationship entered a new, clandestine phase: the UK would henceforward be an insider in US stealth development.

By the time the F-117A Stealth Fighter was rolled out of a hangar at Nellis Air Force Base in Nevada for its first public showing on April 21, 1990, ending speculation concerning the existence of a secret invisible warplane developed by the US, British RAF pilots had been training on the F-117A for at least a year, indeed since the earliest prototypes were available for flight trials in 1982. Beyond this, the F-117A was evaluated for possible purchase by the RAF but turned down by MOD; at 10 Downing Street there were other plans concerning future acquisitions of stealth aircraft."

-- Excerpt from Stealth Warfare by author David Alexander


           "True, there was heavy SEAD by other coalition aircraft and helicraft to pave the way for the black planes, but even so, there were SAM radars trying to track them over Baghdad on the initial nights of the air war that would have lit up less stealthy planes like movie marquees. Gun camera video footage, such as that of the now famous Paveway-augmented PGM strike on the “AT&T Building” downtown, left no doubt that stealth delivered as promised. The Nighthawks were as low-observable as advertised, and the F-117As were later used to strike targets inside Iraq during the joint US-UK Desert Fox air campaign in 1998, and other actions previous and subsequent."

-- Excerpt from Stealth Warfare by author David Alexander

GENRE
History
RELEASED
2019
March 15
LANGUAGE
EN
English
LENGTH
650
Pages
PUBLISHER
Triumvirate International Publications
SELLER
Lawrence Herskovits
SIZE
8.6
MB

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