• $14.99

Publisher Description

In the bestselling tradition of In the Heart of the Sea, The Colony, “an impressively researched” (Rocky Mountain News) account of the history of America’s only leper colony located on the Hawaiian island of Molokai, is “an utterly engrossing look at a heartbreaking chapter” (Booklist) in American history and a moving tale of the extraordinary people who endured it.

Beginning in 1866 and continuing for over a century, more than eight thousand people suspected of having leprosy were forcibly exiled to the Hawaiian island of Molokai -- the longest and deadliest instance of medical segregation in American history. Torn from their homes and families, these men, women, and children were loaded into shipboard cattle stalls and abandoned in a lawless place where brutality held sway. Many did not have leprosy, and many who did were not contagious, yet all were ensnared in a shared nightmare.

Here, for the first time, John Tayman reveals the complete history of the Molokai settlement and its unforgettable inhabitants. It's an epic of ruthless manhunts, thrilling escapes, bizarre medical experiments, and tragic, irreversible error. Carefully researched and masterfully told, The Colony is a searing tale of individual bravery and extraordinary survival, and stands as a testament to the power of faith, compassion, and the human spirit.

GENRE
History
RELEASED
2010
May 11
LANGUAGE
EN
English
LENGTH
432
Pages
PUBLISHER
Scribner
SELLER
SIMON AND SCHUSTER DIGITAL SALES INC
SIZE
10.5
MB

Customer Reviews

Shanethemanwithaplan ,

Stunning

This recount on leperasey ( pardon my spellin) is fantastic it goes into so much detail what these people hadto go through

Stones and Promises ,

The Colony

I’ve read every book by Cottam but this one was a huge disappointment. Dry, plodding, and, frankly, boring as hell!

GoodDogSD ,

The Wrong Author to Tell This Story.

I really wanted to like this book, and until I read the Notes section at the end of the main narrative I did. The style and pace were good and easy to understand. It's a story that is very interesting, tragic, and sad yet also inspiring. But then the author admits that upon seeing the editorial decisions he chose to make, two of the living former residents of the Molokai'i settlement did not want to work with him and did not want to be included in the book. Nevertheless Mr. Tayman refused to respect their wishes and did, in fact, include and identity them. These people were forced into the settlement on Molokai'i against their wishes, and now Mr. Tayman forced them to be included in his book. I believe they have long since earned their right to peaceful anonymity and I question the ethics of Tayman to disregard their wishes. A better author could have written an account just as fascinating and touching as this without needing to offend the very people who had to endure the cruelties of these events. This is an important part of history that should definitely be included in any well-rounded discussion about human rights in America and it's territories. But Mr. Tayman has shown that he is not the right author to properly tell this story and give his subjects the respect and sensitivity they deserve.