Publisher Description

Titus Veturius and Spurius Postumius, with their army, surrounded by the Samnites at the Caudine forks; enter into a treaty, give six hundred hostages, and are sent under the yoke. The treaty declared invalid; the two generals and the other sureties sent back to the Samnites, but are not accepted. Not long after, Papirius Cursor obliterates this disgrace, by vanquishing the Samnites, sending them under the yoke, and recovering the hostages. Two tribes added. Appius Claudius, censor, constructs the Claudian aqueduct, and the Appian road; admits the sons of freedom into the senate. Successes against the Apulians, Etruscans, Umbrians, Marsians, Pelignians, Aequans, and Samnites. Mention made of Alexander the Great, who flourished at this time; a comparative estimate of his strength, and that of the Roman people, tending to show, that if he had carried his arms into Italy, he would not have been as successful there as he had been in the Eastern countries.

GENRE
History
RELEASED
2004
February 1
LANGUAGE
EN
English
LENGTH
890
Pages
PUBLISHER
Public Domain
SELLER
Public Domain
SIZE
797.9
KB

Customer Reviews

RobNorfleet ,

Inspires the imagination

Excellent insights to not only the events of Ancient Rome, but of the extraordinary characteristics of their leaders, which enabled them to build such a great and lasting empire.

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