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Publisher Description

One of the New York Times Book Review's Ten Best Books of the Year

Winner of the James Beard Award

Author of How to Change Your Mind and the #1 New York Times Bestsellers In Defense of Food and Food Rules


What should we have for dinner? Ten years ago, Michael Pollan confronted us with this seemingly simple question and, with The Omnivore’s Dilemma, his brilliant and eye-opening exploration of our food choices, demonstrated that how we answer it today may determine not only our health but our survival as a species. In the years since, Pollan’s revolutionary examination has changed the way Americans think about food. Bringing wide attention to the little-known but vitally important dimensions of food and agriculture in America, Pollan launched a national conversation about what we eat and the profound consequences that even the simplest everyday food choices have on both ourselves and the natural world. Ten years later, The Omnivore’s Dilemma continues to transform the way Americans think about the politics, perils, and pleasures of eating.

GENRE
Health, Mind & Body
RELEASED
2006
April 11
LANGUAGE
EN
English
LENGTH
464
Pages
PUBLISHER
Penguin Publishing Group
SELLER
PENGUIN GROUP USA, INC.
SIZE
2
MB

Customer Reviews

Torino1965 ,

An eye opener.

It is sad to see how dangerous is the cheap food.

Toni FGMAMTC ,

FULL OF MUST KNOW INFO

This is one of the most important books that I think I’ve ever read. It really opened my eyes to some things and made me think about changes that I want to make moving forward. EVERYONE NEEDS TO READ IT.

air_medal ,

A Little Disappointed

By at least one glaringly inaccurate statement very early in the book:

“Grab a beer for your beverage instead and you’d still be drinking corn, in the form of alcohol fermented from glucose refined from corn”

Excerpt From: Pollan, Michael. “The Omnivore's Dilemma.” Harlequin, 2006. iBooks.
This material may be protected by copyright.

Okay, so most decent beers are composed of 4 ingredients - and corn is not one of them. There are some beers that are engineered to be brewed very inexpensively - like Corona - that use corn as an adjunct; others that use rice. But that is only a subset. You would have to grab a specific, lower quality beer to end up with corn-based drink.

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